Get Ready for Crunch Time

It’s finals szn, and the Libraries are here to help alleviate some of the stress that often accompanies this time of year. Below are some tips and resources for a calm and confident exam period.


Time for you

Studying on the first floor of Charles Library

When things get busy it can seem like there is no time for YOU. Avoid this by scheduling “me time.”

  • Are movies your thing? You can check out a DVD or video as well as the equipment to watch them with from the BookBot in Charles Library.
  • Gaming connoisseur? The Duckworth Scholars Studio hosts a gaming hour every Tuesday at 10:00 am EST. Join them on December 7 for King of Tokyo or December 14 for Meeple Party. Both days will also feature other options like Jenga and Bananagrams. You can also look into borrowing gaming equipment, including controllers, board games, and cards from the Libraries at your convenience.
  • Like to escape into a fun book? Leisure reading books including graphic novels, YA, fantasy, mystery, science fiction, and memoirs are kept on the first floor of Charles Library in the short stacks, and just past the main floor service desk inside the Ginsburg Library.

Bake your stress away

Basked of breadYour body needs food, especially to fuel you through studying, so take a break to cook or bake something delicious. It just might be therapeutic! Check out some recipes from our collections including the Blockson Collection and Special Collections Research Center as well as from the DPLA’s Pennsylvania-based cookbooks.

Writing—but make it fun

Journaling can be a nice way to vent some of the stress. Check out these journaling tips from Hayley, a peer educator at the Wellness Resource Center. 

Dogs–need we say more? 

Petting dog in Charles Library

We are hosting dogs for petting or viewing on Wednesday, December 8 from 1:00–3:00 pm EST. 

Guided Wellness

We are lucky to have the Wellness Resource Center to help us help ourselves. Attend a workshop for a guided practice in stress management.

Staying Present: Using Mindfulness to Manage Stress

Wednesday, December 8, 3:30–4:00 pm

Learn how mindfulness and related skills can help manage stress and invite calm. Guided activities will be offered as an opportunity to practice these skills. This program is offered monthly and consists of an overview of mindfulness principles followed by a new skill or practice to make each session unique. Zoom link

Owl About Stress

Monday, December 13, 2:00–2:30 pm

Stress isn’t all bad and this program will help folks explore ways to find balance for optimal performance without burning out. Students will learn about self-care and create their own self-care plan to feel more supported during those especially stressful times of the semester. Zoom link

Music makes me [keep] control

DYK that you can listen to music for free through our databases?! Want some classical music to be the background sound for studying? Try Mozart piano sonatas from Naxos Music Library.

Perhaps the likes of Miles Davis and John Coltrane soothe your soul? Naxos Jazz is great for that. Have something else in mind? Check out Music Online for a variety of music genres from all over the world.

5th Annual Winter concert promo

Join us virtually for a live concert by the TachyChordia a capella group on Dec. 15 at noon.

Get your hands dirty

Charles Library green roof

While gardens may already have been put to bed for the winter, indoor plants often need repotting or other TLC. The tactile experience of digging through dirt can be a peaceful activity, not to mention the feeling of productivity that results from seeing your plant thriving in a whole new pot. Our Ambler Library specializes in agriculture resources. You can get started with these gardening ebooks

Animals alleviating angst

Have to miss Destress with Dogs? Fear not, you can always check out the videos of animals at the Philadelphia Zoo for some comfort (especially this baby sloth!). Or get lost in the vast array of creature cams on explore.org!


Whatever works for you, it is important to practice self-care during this final exam period. Our 24/7 space is open to suit your study habits. The event space on the first floor will also be available as a quiet study zone during limited times between 12/7–12/15; check for the daily schedule posted outside of the room. Our library chat is available 24/7 or you can call, email, or text us during regular hours.

Follow the Wellness Resource Center for more self-care tips or reach out to Temple Libraries for more assistance. Feeling more than finals stress? Tuttleman Counseling Services is available to provide mental health support.

Good luck!

Care and Custody: Past Responses to Mental Health

Guest post by Courtney Eger, Learning and Engagement Librarian

Design proposal of the Sheppard Asylum near Baltimore, MD by Calvert Vaux, 1860
Image courtesy of the National Library of Medicine

The week of October 3rd is Mental Illness Awareness Week, the perfect time for Ginsburg Health Sciences Library’s online programming around Care and Custody: Past Responses to Mental Health. In the United States, it was once common practice to commit people to asylums if they had a mental health condition and their family was unable to care for them. 

Over time, the horrors of institutional care were revealed (overcrowding, abuse, etc.).  Asylums were closed in a process called deinstitutionalization, creating issues of care in the community. New problems arose from this change, including an increase in incarceration for those with mental health conditions and more attention to community-based treatment programs. 

George Elder in the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, photograph by Nelson Martinez, 1971
Image courtesy of the Special Collections Research Center, Temple University

You can read more about this history at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) online exhibit website. There is even a Temple connection in the NLM’s exhibit: this photo of George Elder from the Libraries’ Special Collections Research Center 

​The Ginsburg Health Sciences Library invites you to attend a series of online events and workshops related to this topic from October 4–7, 2021. Our lineup includes:

  • Two workshops
    • Bias in Mental Health Literature, presented by Courtney Eger
    • Searching for Mental Health Topics, presented by Stephanie Roth
  • Two online lectures
    • From Incarceration to Therapeutics in the Friends’ Asylum: Treating Philadelphia’s ‘Insane’ in the 19th Century. Dr. Darin Hayton of Haverford College will speak on local mental health history. 
    • Giving Asylum to Those Who Need It. Dr. Dominic Sisti of UPenn will speak about deinstitutionalization and mass incarceration. 
  • One panel
    • Mental Health and Academics: Tips and Strategies for College Students with speakers Janie Egan (Temple University Wellness Resource Center), Hannah Roach (student, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Class of 2023), Janet A. Castellini (MSS, LCSW), and Jen Rowe (Disability Resources and Services)
    • (Please note—The panel #FreeBritney: A Case Study in Care vs Custody, originally planned for this week, has been postponed.)
  • In addition there will be Creative Self Care kits for health sciences students on campus. Stop by the Ginsburg or Podiatry Libraries on Monday, October 4 to pick up a create-your-own jigsaw puzzle kit (while supplies last!).

Learn more about these events at our program website or on our events page!

Image courtesy of the National Library of Medicine

New exhibit: Med school students get to know North Philly neighbors

Quote

“The idea was to see the world literally and figuratively through a new lens, to begin conversations, listen to stories, and capture the images of people living near Temple University Hospital and the Lewis Katz School of Medicine, the very people we will care for one day.”

—Lewis Katz School of Medicine (LKSOM) students

A new exhibit, Neighbors of North Philly, is now on display at Charles Library as part of Temple University Libraries’ Beyond the Page public programming series, Made in North Philly. The exhibit showcases the work of Lewis Katz School of Medicine (LKSOM) students as part of a project to get to know members of the surrounding community.

At Temple’s Health Sciences Center, students can enroll in an elective course where they get to meet individuals they may one day provide care for at Temple Hospital. Taught by Michael Vitez, director of narrative medicine at Temple University’s LKSOM, students are tasked with going out into neighborhoods surrounding Temple Hospital, finding people to speak with, and making conversation with them. From that conversation stems a narrative and better understanding of the people in the community. The class culminates with photos and stories to share about the neighbors. This exhibit includes work from students enrolled in the course in fall 2018 and 2019. 

View Neighbors of North Philly on the fourth floor of Charles Library, room 401, now through December.

Announcing fall theme: Made in North Philly

This past spring, our Beyond the Page public programming series explored the home of Temple’s Main Campus and Health Sciences Center: North Philadelphia. We looked back on the past and considered the present and future of North Broad and beyond: the people, places, communities, and stories Made in North Philly.

Aerial photo of North Broad Street with Met sign

Aerial photo of North Broad Street, Temple University photography

You can view recordings of spring 2021 programs on our website.

We invite you to join us in the fall as we continue the conversation with a mix of in-person and virtual programming. We’ll take a walk up Broad Street together as we screen more gems from our video archives. We’ll meet current residents of North Philadelphia through the Narrative Medicine program’s Neighbors of North Philly project. And we’ll learn more about institutions like the Church of the Advocate and the Uptown Theater.

These programs are designed to shine a light on North Philly and its incredible history, showcase the resiliency of the community and organizations that reside here, and inspire you in your own work.

And of course, we’ll continue to offer the concerts, Blockson Collection events, and partnership programs that you’ve come to expect from Temple Libraries.

View the schedule of upcoming events on our events page, and check back often as new programs are being added daily. All programs are free and open to the public.


Exhibits

Check out some of our exhibits to accompany our programming this fall!

Photo of man in North Philadelphia

From the Neighbors of North Philly exhibit

  • Care and Custody: Past Responses to Mental Health, Ginsburg Health Sciences Library, on view September–November 2021
  • Exploring Eastern North Philadelphia: Students and Community Engagement, Charles Library Exhibit Space, on view September – December 2021
  • Neighbors of North Philly, presented by Lewis Katz School of Medicine students, Charles Library, Room 401, on view September – December 2021
  • The Quest for Freedom and Dignity: Celebrating William Still and Harriet Tubman, Blockson Collection, on view through June 2022

Keep in touch

Have ideas for future programs? Let us know!

We hope to see you this fall!

 – the library programming team

 

Behind the scenes with the Blockson Collection

Welcome back to Temple University Libraries’ programs and events blog! For our first post in a while, we’re going behind the scenes to tell you more about the programming brought to you by the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection.

First, we’ll take a look back at some of the Blockson Collection’s recent programs, and then we’ll check in with Dr. Diane Turner, curator, and Leslie Willis-Lowry, associate archivist, who help plan and coordinate Blockson Collection programs.

Still from walkthrough of The Quest for Freedom and Dignity: Celebrating William Still and Harriet Tubman exhibit, from the Blockson Collection’s Juneteenth program

June programs celebrated Black Music Month, Juneteenth, and William Still

On June 3, we went on a musical journey with pianist, composer, producer, teacher, and dancer Alfie Pollitt. Pollitt, who has worked with a number of famed musicians in the genres of so-called jazz and rhythm and blues, spoke candidly about his life experiences and career. We invite you to view the program and watch the fascinating stories, hear musical tributes, and learn a little more about Black music in honor of Black Music Month.

Later that month, we celebrated the bicentennial of William Still’s birth and Juneteenth. We started off by watching a video walkthrough of The Quest for Freedom and Dignity: Celebrating William Still and Harriet Tubman exhibit, on view through June 2022 in the Blockson Collection. Then, Charles L. Blockson, curator emeritus and founder of the collection, reflected personally on his family history and relations to William Still and Harriet Tubman in a video from a previous program held at the Blockson Collection. View the entire program on our website. And, check out this article highlighting some items in the collection that can help us better appreciate and understand the significance of Juneteenth.


Meet the staff

We checked in with two Blockson Collection staff members, Dr. Diane Turner and Leslie Willis Lowry, to ask about recent programs, the shift to virtual events during the pandemic, and the upcoming season. But first, let’s meet them!

Dr. Diane D. Turner is curator of the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection at Temple University Libraries. Dr. Turner holds three Temple University degrees. Her areas of specialization and research include African American Labor, Cultural and Social History, Philadelphia Jazz History, Independent Black Filmmakers, Oral History, and Public History. Her dissertation is entitled Organizing and Improvising: A History of Philadelphia’s Black Musicians’ Protective Union Local 274, American Federation of Musician. She has taught African-American history at the university level including Brown University, Northeastern University, Rowan University, University of South Florida (Tampa, FL) and other institutions.  She has authored My Name is Oney Judge (2010), Feeding the Soul: Black Music, Black Thought (2011) and Our Grand Pop is a Montford Point Marine (2018), co-authored with her father, Corporal Thomas S. Turner Sr. Her writings appear in anthologies and scholarly journals. She serves as a consultant on a number of advisory boards and committees such as Bethel Burial Ground Historic Site Memorial Committee, Chronicling Resistance, Scribe Video’s Precious Places and others. She is president of the Montford Point Marines Association, Philadelphia Chapter #1 Auxiliary. Her current book project is a history of jazz in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Leslie Willis Lowry is associate archivist at the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection at Temple University Libraries, and has worked in collections management and as an archivist, researcher and consultant in several capacities, including special collections, exhibitions, films, television and publications for over thirty years, including the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, the International African American Museum in Charleston, the African American Museum in Philadelphia, The Museum of Afro-American History in Boston, The Studio Museum in Harlem, The Bronx Museum of Art, Scholastic Books, among others. As a curatorial and research assistant to Deborah Willis, the nation’s leading historian of African American photography and curator of African American culture, Leslie has cataloged the work of individual photographers, photographic collections and groups of photographs that are part of an exhibition and publications; in addition to researching and planning for photographic exhibitions. After years of working in management, supervising hundreds of employees, and as liaison and consultant to many cultural institutions and religious organizations, Leslie’s career has been divided into two distinct areas – archival and education – within the broad areas of photographic history, visual culture, African American history and popular and material culture. Within these fields she has consistently emphasized the importance of the use of the archives to build programming, education and community connections.


Building Blockson Collection programs

Diane and Leslie took turns answering our questions about programming at the Blockson Collection.

Temple Libraries (TL): How do you go about planning programs for the Blockson Collection? Where do you get your ideas from and/or how do you choose speakers to feature?
Diane Turner (DT): Blockson Collection staff use program planning meetings to collaboratively work on developing programs. We use our knowledge base of history and culture in Philadelphia for inspiration and in identifying potential speakers.

TL: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, all of the Libraries’ programs and events have gone virtual. What has that been like for the Blockson Collection’s programming? Have there been any unexpected benefits or challenges?
Leslie Willis Lowry (LWL): The Blockson Collection accomplished a great deal during this unusual period of working remotely through the COVID-19 pandemic. As an initiative to stay connected with members of our community, programs were redesigned using a virtual platform to give it the modern aesthetic needed for further reach. The virtual programs continue to enable our community members to become aware of new research and to identify emerging scholars and programming that addresses issues that are a part of our mission.

With the rich and impactful virtual programming we produced this year, we were able to strengthen our visibility and expand our contact list numbers. We were also able to develop wider audiences online through social media growth. Attendees were represented both nationally and internationally.

TL: Can you share a favorite moment from your recent June programs?
DT: The [June 3rd] program was pre-recorded at the Philadelphia Clef Club, and this was the first live music that I had heard since February 2020.  Also, we lost Sam Reed so we are honored to have featured him for Jazz Appreciation Month.

TL: Anything you can tell us about the upcoming 2021-2022 programming season?
LWL: The Blockson Collection’s upcoming 2021-2022 programs season includes the following:

SEPTEMBER
September 22 | Glenn Ellis
History of Black Health in America

September 29 | Gospel Music Heritage Month
Honoring the Legendary Marion Williams

OCTOBER
October 7 | William Still’s birthday Celebration

October 19 | Scribe Video Center | Precious Places Community History Project Screenings
-The Freedom Theatre
-William Penn High School
-Church of the Advocate
-OIC

October 28 | Cullen Knight
Entertainment, Jazz and Social life in North Philadelphia

NOVEMBER
November 9 | Oral History Program with Karen Warrington
Ile Ife Black Humanitarian Center: The Importance of the Center and its Cultural Impact

November 18 | Author Talk: Haki Madhubuti
“The Autobiography of a Black Vegan”

Check library.temple.edu/events closer to the start of the fall semester for program details.

It’s Crunch Time: Take a Break with the Libraries!

The Libraries are once again offering our Crunch Time Café to help you refuel and relax as you prep for final exams. Our offerings are a bit different this year, as we prepare Paley for the move to Charles Library, so read on to see where you can find us.

Be on the lookout Tuesday, April 30 around late morning as we travel through Paley Library handing out snacks from our awesome library cart. High fives are most appreciated.

You can also stop by our table on the First Floor of Paley from 2:00-4:00 pm on Wednesday, May 1 and 9:00–11:00 am on Monday, May 6 for snacks and to share your favorite memories of Paley in our video booth.

And don’t worry—we didn’t forget the therapy dogs! We’re partnering this year with the Wellness Resource Center to bring Destress with Dogs to the Student Center 217A on Thursday, May 2 from 11:30 am–2:30 pm.


Need research help?

Chat, text, email, or make an appointment with a subject librarian at library.temple.edu/asktulibraries.  

And to make your studying easier

Paley Library is open 24/7 from 8:00 AM on Thursday, April 25 through Tuesday, May 7. You can also book study spaces ahead of time at paleystudy.temple.edu.

Short Story Dispenser on Campus

a student uses the short story dispenser

photo by Brae Howard

Last week, the Libraries unveiled our very first Short Édition short story dispenser in the Student Center. With just the push of a button, the dispenser prints a free short story or poem just for you.

Short Édition is a French publishing house of short literature: poetry, short stories, and flash fiction. In addition to their online platform, they publish fiction around the world via their Short Story Dispensers for the public to enjoy a serendipitous literary experience.

Our dispenser features a “Local Fiction” button, which prints out a story written by a member of Temple community or the Philadelphia writing community. The “International Fiction” button dispenses stories from around the world.

photograph of Laura Bates, one of the contest runners up

Laura Bates reads her story, photo by Brae Howard

In conjunction with our dispenser launch, we also held our first creative writing contest. The theme of the contest was “transformation,” and the winners (listed below) joined us at the launch party to read their winning submissions.

 

 

 

Juried Winner
Catherine Averill, “Something to Save”

Juried Runners-up
Laura Bates, “The Sunshine State”
Nicholas Perilli, “Chimera”

Public Winner
Sean Mac Donald, “There is Change”

Be sure to stop by the Student Center (South Lobby, First Floor) to try out the machine and pick up your own story. Follow our social media accounts for future contest announcements:
@TempleLibraries      tulibraries      Temple University Libraries

It’s National Library Week!

Celebrate National Library Week with us! Sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April, National Library Week is a time to celebrate the contributions of our nation’s libraries and librarians in transforming lives and strengthening communities.

At Paley, we’ll be tabling outside (if weather permits!) and there will be snacks, swag, and photo booth opportunities. Stop by and talk to us about the Libraries!

Library Table Hours at Paley:
Monday, April 8, 12:00–2:00 pm
Wednesday, April 10, 1:00–3:00 pm

We’re also teaming up with the Office of Sustainability for Campus Sustainability Week, so check out their Surplus Pop-up outside Paley on Monday.

Finally, make sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to see how we are celebrating in real time. Tag us and #NationalLibraryWeek to join the conversation.

Wikipedia Edit-a-thon: Improving Content on Cis and Trans Women, the Arts, and Feminism

Did you know that, according to a Wikimedia Foundation 2011 study, less than 10% of the editors on Wikipedia are women? When women aren’t represented in the writing and editing of the stories and records of people, the stories get mistold. We lose out on the real history.

Join us next Tuesday, March 19 from 10:00 am to 5:30 pm for the sixth annual (and Temple University Libraries’ fourth!) Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, a global project improving content on cis and trans women, the arts, and feminism on Wikipedia.

We will provide tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, reference materials, and refreshments, and invite people of all gender identities and expressions to participate, particularly transgender and cisgender women. We hope you’ll also join us in the evening for a panel discussion on the intersection of art, feminism, technology, and history.

We’re holding the event in the lobby of the Tyler School of Art and the schedule is outlined below:

Registration at 10:00 AM

Training sessions at 10:30 AM and 1:30 PM

Panel at 6:00 PM (in the Architecture Building, Room 104)

Registration is encouraged and please BYO laptop!

Deadline approaching! Apply for Livingstone Undergraduate Research Awards by 2/18

logo for Livingstone Undergraduate Research AwardsAttention undergrads!

Have a research project you worked on for a Temple course between spring 2018 and now? Why not turn all that hard work into a prestigious award? But don’t delay—you only have until next Monday, February 18 to apply to the Libraries’ Livingstone Undergraduate Research Awards.

These Awards honor the best in Temple undergraduate research, and categories include the humanities, social sciences, STEM disciplines, creative works and media production, diversity and social justice, and general education courses. Plus, there are cash prizes of up to $1,000 for winners in each category.

We are accepting online applications for the Awards through February 18th, 2019 at 11:59 pm. Send us your best work!

Please contact lura@temple.edu with any questions.