November 18, 4PM RECORD, PRESERVE, DOCUMENT, SHAPE: TALKING ABOUT THE PUBLIC HUMANITIES WITH STEVEN LUBAR OF BROWN UNIVERSITY

@ Paley Library Lecture Hall, Ground Floor, 1210 Polett Walk Record, Preserve, Document, Shape: Talking About the Public Humanities A Conversation with Curator and Scholar Steven Lubar of the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage at Brown University How do museums, libraries, archives, universities and other public institutions shape the recording and presentation of artistic and cultural heritage? How does that inform our understanding of the past, present, and future? How do we disseminate humanistic research originating within the ivory tower to the world-at-large? What is the future of cultural programming and publicly funded arts and humanities initiatives? Join a conversation on the state of public culture with Seth Bruggeman of Temple’s Center for Public History and Steven Lubar of Brown University’s John Nicholas Brown Center for the Public Humanities and Cultural Heritage. Lubar is one of the country’s foremost public historians, and leads a graduate program and think tank at Brown University that explores these questions, and more. Prior to Brown, Lubar was a curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. There, he went on to chair the Division of the History of Technology and oversee several major permanent exhibitions, including the groundbreaking America on the Move, which examines the history of public transportation in the United States. In addition to his work at the Smithsonian, Lubar has taught at Johns Hopkins University, the University of Maryland and the University of Pennsylvania. This program is co-sponsored by the Center for Public History at Temple, Village of Arts and Humanities, the Wagner Free Institute of Science, the North Philadelphia Arts and Culture Alliance, and the Center for Public History at Temple. FOTM4SMALL.JPG Food on the Move exhibition curated by John Nicholas Brown Center students, explores the culture around dining out, fast food, and its impact on culture and lifestyle. Lots in Limbo2SMALL.jpg John Nicholas Brown Center Lots in Limbo project, created public art in under-utilized space in Providence, RI. StevenLubarHeadshot.jpg Steven Lubar, photo by Mike Cohea/Brown University

 

 

 

 

 

WagnerLogoSMALL.JPG

NPACALogoSMALL.jpg Village-Logo.jpg

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google Buzz
  • Tumblr
  • email
  • StumbleUpon

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *