Research

  • Walid Saad, Saroj Biswas, Arif Sarwat, CPS: Synergy: Collaborative Research: Towards Secure Networked Cyber-Physical Systems: A Theoretic Framework with Bounded Rationality
Award Numbers: CNS-1446574, CNS-1446621, CNS-1446570
Virginia Tech, Temple University, and Florida International University
https://sites.google.com/site/nsfncps/
Project Summary: 
Securing critical networked cyber-physical systems (NCPSs) such as the power grid or transportation systems has emerged as a major national and global priority. The networked nature of such systems renders them vulnerable to a range of attacks both in cyber and physical domains as corroborated by recent threats such as the Stuxnet worm. Developing security mechanisms for such NCPSs significantly differs from traditional networked systems due to interdependence between cyber and physical subsystems (with attacks originating from either subsystem), possible cooperation between attackers or defenders, and the presence of human decision makers in the loop. The main goal of this research is to develop the necessary science and engineering tools for designing NCPS security solutions that are applicable to a broad range of application domains.

This project will develop a multidisciplinary framework that weaves together principles from cybersecurity, control theory, networking and criminology. The framework will include novel security mechanisms for NCPSs founded on solid control-theoretic and related notions, analytical tools that allow incorporation of bounded human rationality in NCPS security, and experiments with real-world attack scenarios. A newly built cross-institutional NCPS simulator will be used to evaluate the proposed mechanisms in realistic environments. This research transcends specific cyber-physical systems domains and provides the necessary tools to building secure and trustworthy NCPSs. The broader impacts include a new infrastructure for NCPS research and education, training of students, new courses, and outreach events focused on under-represented student groups.

 

  • Saroj Biswas and Li Bai, Hardwire-in-the-Loop Power Distribution Testbed for Control and Security, DURIP, Office of Naval Research, August 1, 2015 – March 31, 2017.
  • Saroj Biswas, “Characterization and Closed Loop Control of Magnetic Signatures”, Office of Naval Research,  N00414-12-1-0192, Dec 2013-Dec 2014. 

Project Summary: 

A first principle mathematical model has been developed that describes the temporal dynamic of the magnetization process.   The developed dynamic model of magnetization is highly nonlinear, which is then used to develop a closed loop feedback control system.  Existing literature on magnetization control investigates effects of static and cyclic variations of applied excitation, whereas this research focuses on magnetization compensation due to unknown time varying and noncyclic excitation.  New analytical results support closed loop control of magnetization process in the presence of unknown ambient excitation and applied stress.

Experimental validation of closed loop control of magnetization process was also investigated. As a proof of concept, a PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controller was implemented in the laboratory for closed loop control of magnetization in 1D and 2D.  Experimental results show that the closed loop controller is able to a) continuously neutralize near-field magnetic signatures of a ferrite structure, b) maintain a desired magnetization level within the structure in the presence of a varying ambient field, and c) maintain a desired near-field signature in the presence of varying applied stress due to seaway forces.

Experimental validation of 3D signatures was found to be not feasible due to various physical constraints and time limitations, instead validation using COMSOL simulation was chosen.  As a first step in this process, an interface between COMSOL simulation environment and Matlab was successfully completed.  Preliminary results on magnetization control of 1D structures are very encouraging.  Simulation experiments using COMSOL should extended for control of 3D magnetization.

 

  • Saroj Biswas, “Characterization and Validation of Magnetic Signatures”, Office of Naval Research, Nov 2012-Nov 2013.
  • Brian Butz, Saroj Biswas, Li Bai, A Realistic Intelligent Multimedia Virtual Laboratory for Power Applications, National Science Foundation, Sept 1, 2012-Aug 31, 2015.
  • Saroj Biswas, “Characterization and Validation of Magnetic Signatures”, Office of Naval Research, Nov 2011-Nov 2012

Project Summary

As a first step toward magnetic silencing, this research investigates mathematical techniques for closed loop control and experimental validation of magnetization of ferrite structures. This research involves two essential components: a) the development of novel real time control algorithms to compensate magnetic effects due to unknown applied excitation and applied stress due to seaway forces, and b) experimental validation of control algorithm in laboratory.

A first principle mathematical model has been developed that describes the temporal dynamic of the magnetization process. The developed dynamic model of magnetization is highly nonlinear, which is then used in a control system framework to develop a closed loop feedback control system. It is shown that the developed control system is able to maintain the magnetization of the structure at any desired level in the presence of arbitrary ambient excitation and applied stress. New analytical results have also been derived that show that magnetization can be controlled even if the ambient field is randomly varying. Simulation studies are performed to illustrate the proposed method of closed loop control of magnetization.

Experimental validation of closed loop control of magnetization process was also investigated. LabView code was developed and tested for data acquisition and control. Although the original controller is nonlinear, as a proof of concept, a PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controller has been implemented for closed loop control. Experimental results show that the closed loop controller is able to a) continuously neutralize near-field magnetic signatures of a ferrite structure, and b) maintain a desired magnetization level within the structure in the presence of a varying ambient field.

The analytical and experimental results presented in this report form fundamental concepts on real time control of magnetization. Further research should be continued for development of a control system for 3D structures as well as for structures in stress field due to seaway forces. If appropriate, field testing of the developed control systems should be conducted for validation of control concepts.

 

  • Saroj Biswas, “An experimental Facility for Stress Magnetization and Hysteresis”, DURIP, Office of Naval Research, June 2011 – Sept 2012.

Project Summary

The objective of this project is to develop an experimentation facility for magnetization research that are of importance to the Navy. This experimental facility complements our analytical and simulation research on magnetization at Temple University, and will greatly enhance our ability to develop control system algorithms that could be used to mask magnetic signatures of structures.  The centerpiece of the lab is the Test Resources 300-Series Stress Table, which is controlled via a PC through the controller box, and produces uni-axial forces up to 10 kN.  A GPIB card is used to facilitate data acquisition and control over the bipolar power supplies and Agilent measurement equipment.  The Stress Table load cell provides compressive and tensile measurements via the control box.  The Honeywell HMC-2003 captures tri-axis magnetic flux data between ±2 G.  USB Hall probes provide sensitive axial flux measurements. The Agilent Power Supply controls the bipolar supply for field control. The Bipolar supplies operate up to 200W.  Various measuring instruments are also available in the laboratory.

 

  • Saroj Biswas, “Characterization of Effects of Cyclic Stress on Ship’s Magnetic Signatures”, Office of Naval Research, March, 2011-August 2011.
  • Saroj Biswas (and a consortium of universities in US, PI: Ned Mohan, University of Minnesota), “A Nationwide Consortium of Universities to Revitalize Electric Power Engineering Education by State-of-the-Art Laboratories”, Department of Energy, July 2010 – June 2013.
  • Jie Wu, Igor Rivin, Michael L. Klein, Saroj Biswas, Li Bai, Yuan Shi, “A Hybrid High Performance GPU/CPU System”, National Science Foundation, May 2010-April 2013.
  • Saroj Biswas, “Modeling and Control of Ship’s Magnetic Signatures”, Office of Naval Research, April 2010 – March 2011.
  • Saroj Biswas. “Characterization of Ship’s Magnetic Signatures with Hysteresis”, Office of Naval Research, April 2010 – June 2011.
  • Li Bai and Saroj Biswas, “Intelligent Distributed Computation Algorithms on Zigbee 802.15.4 Network”, Office of Naval Research, April 2008-April 2009.
  • Musoke Sendaula and Saroj K. Biswas, “Science and Engineering Interactive Learning Communities”, funded by National Science Foundation, 2002-2005.
  • Saroj K. Biswas and Musoke Sendaula, “An Intelligent Agent for Isolation of Incipient Faults in Communication Networks”, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 1999-2000.
  • Saroj K. Biswas, “A Neural Network Approach to NASCOM Fault Management”, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 1997-1998.
  • Musoke Sendaula and Saroj Biswas, “Development of an Automatic Depth Control System for an Autonomous Vehicle”, FMC/BMY Combat Systems, York, Pennsylvania, 1993-1994.  
  • Shih J. Chen and Saroj K. Biswas, “Material Processing using Microwave Energy”, Temple University Research Incentive Fund, 1997-1998.
  • Saroj Biswas, “Optimal Control of Flexible Robotic Manipulators”, Temple University Summer Faculty Fellowship, 1988.

 

 

 

  • Recent Comments

    • Archives

    • Categories

      • No categories
    • Meta