Research

Broadly speaking, my laboratory research concerns the linkages between self and other, how these linkages develop, and the neural processes involved in their instantiation. The premise of this ongoing endeavor is that studying the ontogeny of the connections between self and other can highlight the fundamentally embodied nature of interpersonal ties, beginning in infancy and continuing throughout the lifespan. Together with my research group I have published various papers related to this topic, often with a focus on the use of electrophysiological (primarily EEG) measures.

I have also written various articles on wider theoretical issues concerning the biological construct of embodiment, with a focus on developmental issues and the implications of embodied approaches for understanding the role of neuroscience data in psychology. Other research interests include individual differences in early social-emotional development and the effect of early adversity on brain and behavioral functioning.