My Hometown Xi’an

Xi’an (Chinese西安pinyinXī’ān About this sound listen ), is the capital of Shaanxi ProvincePeople’s Republic of China. It is a sub-provincial city located in the center of the Guanzhong Plain in Northwest China.[1] One of the oldest cities in China, Xi’an is the oldest of the Four Great Ancient Capitals, having held the position under several of the most important dynasties in Chinese history,[2] including Western ZhouQinWestern HanSui, and Tang.[2] Xi’an is the starting point of the Silk Road and home to the Terracotta Army of Emperor Qin Shi Huang.[3]

Since the 1990s

, as part of the economic revival of inland China especially for the central and northwest regions, the city of Xi’an has re-emerged as an important cultural, industrial and educational centre of the central-northwest region, with facilities for research and developmentnational security and China’s space exploration program. Xi’an currently holds sub-provincial status, administering 9 districts and 4 counties.[4] As of 2015 Xi’an has a population of 8,705,600 and the Xi’an-Xianyang metropolitan area has a population of 13,569,700.[5][6] It is the most populous city in Northwest China, as well as one of the three most populous cities in Western China.[7] According to a July 2012 report by the Economist Intelligence Unit, it was recently named as one of the 13

 

emerging megacities, or megalopolises, in China.[8] The report pinpoints and highlights the demographic and income trends that are shaping these cities’ development.

 

Giant Wild Goose Pagoda

Giant Wild Goose Pagoda or Big Wild Goose Pagoda (Chinese大雁塔pinyinDàyàn tǎ), is a Buddhist pagoda located in southern Xi’anShaanxi province, China. It was built in 652 during the Tang dynasty and originally had five stories. The structure was rebuilt in 704 during the reign of Empress Wu Zetian, and its exterior brick facade was renovated during the Ming dynasty. One of the pagoda’s many functions was to hold sutras and figurines of the Buddha that were brought to China from India by the Buddhist translator and traveler Xuanzang. Continue reading

Tang dynasty

The Tang dynasty (Chinese[a]) was an imperial dynasty of China preceded by the Sui dynasty and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture.[4] Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty, and the Tang capital at Chang’an (present-day Xi’an) was the most populous city in the world.

The dynasty was founded by the  family (李), who seized power during the decline and collapse of the Sui Empire. The dynasty was briefly interrupted when Empress Wu Zetian seized the throne, proclaiming the Second Zhou dynasty (690–705) and becoming the only Chinese empress regnant. In two censuses of the 7th and 8th centuries, the Tang records estimated the population by number of registered households at about 50 million people.[5][6] Yet, even when the central government was breaking down and unable to compile an accurate census of the population in the 9th century, it is estimated that the population had grown by then to about 80 million people.[7][8][b] With its large population base, the dynasty was able to raise professional and conscripted armies of hundreds of thousands of troops to contend with nomadic powers in dominating Inner Asia and the lucrative trade routes along the Silk RoadVarious kingdoms and states paid tribute to the Tang court, while the Tang also conquered or subdued several regions which it indirectly controlled through a protectorate system. Besides political hegemony, the Tang also exerted a powerful cultural influence over neighboring states such as those in VietnamKorea and Japan.

The Terracotta Army

The Terracotta Army (simplified Chinese兵马俑traditional Chinese兵馬俑; literally: “Soldier-and-horse funerary statues”) is a collection of terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor in 210–209 BCE and whose purpose was to protect the emperor in his afterlife.

The figures, dating from approximately the late third century BCE,[1] were discovered in 1974 by local farmers in Lintong DistrictXi’an, Shaanxi province. The figures vary in height according to their roles, with the tallest being the generals. The figures include warriors, chariots and horses. Estimates from 2007 were that the three pits containing the Terracotta Army held more than 8,000 soldiers, 130 chariots with 520 horses and 150 cavalry horses, the majority of which remained buried in the pits nearby Qin Shi Huang’s mausoleum.[2] Other terracotta non-military figures were found in other pits, including officialsacrobatsstrongmen and musicians.