Is the Smartphone Camera Replacing the DSLR?

With the evolution of mobile phone technology occurring so rapidly, in an attempt to make our daily lives easier, it’s no wonder that older technologies are being replaced by new smartphone technologies. For instance, the cell phone has virtually eliminated the need for a landline telephone, beepers, and, for some people, even computers. It is hard to make the argument to keep all of these outdated technologies when we now have the convenience of having the world at our fingertips. But now, as another medium hang in the midst of virtual extinction thanks to evolving smartphone technologies, we have to examine the question of whether or not the smartphone camera is capable of replacing the DSLR cameras that we still use today.

Smartphone photography has taken the world by storm so much so that some colleges, including our very own Temple University, have designed courses specific to studying this new medium. Although, it is understandable that people are choosing the convenience of using the smaller materials they have on hand to capture moments rather than buying a more costly and bulky device for photography, the question of accuracy has always been an issue when dealing with smartphone photography. Mainly, can a phone lens accurately depict what is in front of you, or is the image distorted?  Although we recognize that smartphones cameras are improving their accuracy, and the factor of the convenience of size and accessibility is also apparent, why do we still need DSLR cameras?

Let’s compare some images taken on a smartphone versus some taken on a DSLR and see if there really is a chance that the smartphone can replace the DSLR.

Can you guess which pictures were taken on with a Camera vs. Smartphone?

4
7
8

Camera: 2,4,5,6 Phone: 1,3,7,8

In my opinion, until smartphone developers come up with sensors that compete with those present in DSLR cameras, DSLRs will continue to reign superior in terms of quality images. Smartphones are a good contender, though. I can see a slight difference in depth in the smartphone photos versus the DSLR ones, making the smartphone a nice smaller, second option. But if I had to choose, I’m still more likely to reach for a DSLR.

Has an App Made Us More Narcissistic?

It’s a relatively common belief in the US that with every new generation, we experience some sort of cultural shift as society becomes more individualistic and self oriented, and our perceptions begin to alter from those of the previous generation (Twenge, et al, 2008). We have also come to recognize that frequent advancements in digital technology and mass media have the tendency to alter our societal perceptions in interesting and, in some cases, dangerous ways. So, it’s not very surprising that the popularity of the mobile photo-sharing app, Instagram, that revolves around the idea of self promotion through digital media, has skyrocketed since its introduction in 2010. So much so that many people consider engagement with the app a habitual aspect of their daily lives. Now with all of this in mind, we can begin to examine how this introduction of newer media to newer generations further effects their already changing perception, and most specifically their perceptions of themselves since we are discussing an app that broadcasts content surrounding the lives of its users. This brings us to the argument that daily interaction with this application has created the most self centered, big headed, egotistical generation that our parents didn’t even see coming (Paramboukis, et al, 2016).

Narcissism, for the purposes of the analysis, can be defined as excessive self love or an inflated sense of self. It makes perfect sense that this application, formed as a venue for self promotion and presentation, also be a tool to propel its users’ further toward an exaggerated sense of self as it fuels each user with validation by means of likes, popularity by hashtags, and flawlessness with filters. But what the age old argument that social media is extremely damaging to our self esteem, leading to loneliness, depression, and a deflated sense of self? One study that examined 150 students, to determine the relationship between social media and self esteem, ultimately determined that increased usage leads to an increase in psychological stress and lower self-esteem (Jan, M. et al, 2017). So how can our generation possibly demonstrate excessive self love, while also exhibiting characteristics of low self esteem? Turns out, its possible, and more common than you think.

 Most people would think that the average narcissist is someone who has been filled with confidence and high sense of approval since birth (you know, someone who received a participation trophy after losing that soccer game). But in fact, sources tell us that today’s narcissist has very low self esteem and often posts pictures on Instagram that show off their best assets in order to gain higher standing, attention, and more self-esteem (Jackson & Luchner, 2018). With all this promotional posting to prove a point, we eventually end up falling in love with the person we portray ourselves to be online, an unrealistic representation of ourselves. So in fact, it doesn’t matter if Instagram makes us feel good or bad, either way, it’s still making us more narcissistic.

In my opinion, I do think that this platform tends to applaud us for our narcissistic behaviors, essentially encouraging us to continue to self promote. But in this day and age, is self promotion on Instagram a horrible thing? Can we really count that as being narcissistic, or is this a normal practice of our society now? After all, since there are cultural changes with every generation, maybe our generation chose this as our new form of self expression.

Sources

Jackson, C., Luchner, A. (2018). Self-presentation Mediates the Relationship Between Self-criticism and Emotional Response to Instagram Feedback. Personality and Individual Relationship Between Self-criticism and Emotional Response to Instagram Feedback. FL. Personality and Individual Differences Vol. 133.

Jan, M., Soomro, S., Ahmad, N. (2017). Impact of Social Media on Self-Esteem. Pakistan. European Scientific Journal. Vol. 13. No. 23.

Paramboukis, O., Skues, J., Wise, L. (2016). An Exploratory Study of the Relationships between  Narcissism, Self-Esteem and Instagram Use. Social Networking. 82-92.

Twenge, J., Konrath, S., Foster, J., Campbell, W., Bushman, B. (2008). Further Evidence of an     Increase in Narcissism Among College Students. CA. Journal of Personality. 920-927.

Battle of The Generations: Who is more narcissistic? Me? Or My Mom?

Narcissism, for the purposes of the experiment, can be defined as excessive self love or an inflated sense of self.

It’s a relatively common belief in the US that with every new generation, we experience some sort of cultural shift as society becomes more individualistic and self oriented, and our perceptions begin to alter from those of the previous generation (Twenge, et al, 2008). We have also come to recognize that frequent advancements in digital technology and mass media have the tendency to alter our societal perceptions in some interesting ways. So, it’s not very surprising that the popularity of the mobile photo-sharing app, Instagram, that revolves around the idea of self promotion through digital media, has skyrocketed since its introduction in 2010. So much so that many people consider engagement with the app a habitual aspect of their daily lives, including myself. Now with all of this in mind, we can begin to examine how this introduction of newer media to newer generations further effects their already changing perception, and most specifically their perceptions of themselves since we are discussing an app that broadcasts content surrounding the lives of its users. This brings us to the ever-growing argument that daily interaction with this application has created a more self centered, big headed, egotistical generation that our parents didn’t even see coming (Paramboukis, et al, 2016).

But how true are these statement? Join me to find out in an interview below discussing photography and self promo then vs. now and taking the ultimate test to determine if an app has made me more narcissistic than my mother!

My beautiful Mom
Me killing it…like always
TRT 04:58

 In my opinion, I do think that this platform tends to applaud us for our narcissistic behaviors, essentially encouraging us to continue to self promote. But in this day and age, is self promotion on Instagram a horrible thing? Can we really count that as being narcissistic, or is this a normal practice of our society now? After all, since there are cultural changes with every generation, maybe our generation chose this as our new form of self expression.

Let me know what you guys think down below! Because I am thoroughly confused now!!

Take the test yourself!

https://openpsychometrics.org/tests/NPI/

Visit the link below for the full scoop!

https://sites.temple.edu/mobmedblog/2019/09/27/has-an-app-made-us-more-narcissistic/

Sources Referenced

Paramboukis, O., Skues, J., Wise, L. (2016). An Exploratory Study of the Relationships between  Narcissism, Self-Esteem and Instagram Use. Social Networking. 82-92.

Raskin, R. Terry, H. (1988). A principal-components analysis of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and further evidence of its construct validity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol 54(5), 890-902.

Twenge, J., Konrath, S., Foster, J., Campbell, W., Bushman, B. (2008). Further Evidence of an     Increase in Narcissism Among College Students. CA. Journal of Personality. 920-927.