Feminist Ethics and Political Philosophy (4223/5223)

Feminist Ethics and Political Philosophy (4223/5223)

Time: Thursday 3:00-6:00 (Spring 2019)

Professor: Dr. Shaeeda Mensah

CRN: Undergrad 37750 Grad: 37754

Course description: Most people can easily recount the names and stories of Black boys and men who have been directly impacted by mass incarceration and police violence. Few, though, know the names and stories of Black girls and women who have been directly impacted by mass incarceration and police violence. In this course, we will explore the myriad of reasons that this is the case. In so doing, we will consider the narrative of Black girls and women as the collateral consequence of mass incarceration and police violence, and we will explore the notion that Black women’s womanhood protects them from mass incarceration and police violence, and we will explore the historical and contemporary conditions that have led to the marginalization of Black women’s experiences in both race and gender analyses. This is a one-time course offered by our Diversity and Postdoctoral Fellow for 2018-2019, Dr. Shaeeda Mensah.

Introduction to Feminist Philosophy (2152)

Introduction to Feminist Philosophy (2152)

Times: Section 001 – Tuesday/Thursday 11:00-12:20, Section 002 – Monday/Wednesday/Friday 10:00-10:50 (Spring 2019)

Professors: Lee-Ann Chae (Section 001); Kate Brelje (Section 002)

Course description: This course covers major themes in feminist philosophy through canonical and recent texts. Themes include the sex/gender distinction; oppression, equality, and justice; work and family; feminist care ethics; pornography and prostitution; sex-positivity and sex-negativity; feminist epistemology and feminist critiques of science. Throughout the course, discussions will consider the intersection of gender with race, class, disability, global location, sexuality, and age.

Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science (3217/5217)

Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science (3217/5217)

Time: Monday 3:00-5:30 (Spring 2019)

Professor: Miriam Solomon

CRN: Undergrad: 37747 Grad: 37753

Course description: This course explores he effects of gender on knowledge in general and science in particular. Feminist critiques since the 1970s challenge traditional claims that knowledge and science are completely objective and unbiased. Unlike relativist approaches, feminist critiques often provide new, more nuanced accents of objectivity (sometimes called “strong objectivity”). We will examine a range of feminist accounts (e.g. feminist standpoint, feminist postmodern and feminist empiricist) and look at cases from a wide range of sciences. The complex relations between gender, race, class, and nationality will also be discussed in relation to these issues. For graduate students in philosophy, this course satisfies the distribution requirement in epistemology/metaphysics.

Unruly Women: Philosophers, Artists, & Activists (3910.02)

Unruly Women: Philosophers, Artists, & Activists (3910.02)

Time: Monday 3:00-5:30 (Spring 2019)

Professor: Kristin Gjesdal

CRN: 38857

Course description: A quiet study or the rowdy barricades? Contemplative life or activism? Art or philosophy? These are some of the questions facing women philosophers and artists in the modern period. Women philosophers and poets have written on politics, racial injustice, gender, and social issues. And they have sought to translate their thoughts into concrete political action. In the philosophical tradition, works by women philosophers have been ignored. In this class, we will discuss contributions by a number of bright and gifted women whose work presented – and still presents! – a fundamental challenge to social injustice and established conventions. We will also discuss issues such as canon-building, inclusion criteria, and prejudices. The class will be an interactive, discussion-based, and fun exploration of a largely unwritten chapter in the history of philosophy. This an Honors Special Topics Course, offered in the Honors Program.