Relax and Refuel at Paley Library During Final Exams

The Libraries are bringing back our Crunch Time Café between May 3rd and 9th to help you relax and refuel during study days and final exams. The ever-popular therapy dogs will also be on hand to help you destress! The full list of events is included below, all of which will take place in the Paley Library Lecture Hall, 1210 Polett Walk, Ground Floor.


Crafts & Games
Wednesday, May 3, Noon–3:00PM
Take a break from studying by unwinding with crafts and games the day before final exams begin.

 

Get Your Study On
Thursday, May 4, 6:00–8:00 PM
Join us the first day of exams for caffeine, treats, and healthy snacks. You got this!

Destress with Dogs
Friday, May 5, 1:00–2:30 PM
Monday, May 8, 10:30 AM–Noon
As exams are in full swing, can you imagine anything better than taking a break with cuddly, sweet therapy dogs? Neither can we! Stop by to hang out and destress with some furry friends.

The End is Near!
Tuesday, May 9, 7:30–11:00 AM
You are so close! Join us one last time for breakfast treats and coffee to help you power through to the end of exams and propel you toward a much needed summer break.

 


AND TO MAKE YOUR STUDYING EASIER

Paley Library is open 24/7 through April 28-May 9. You can also book study spaces ahead of time at paleystudy.temple.edu.

Posted in Uncategorized

The students we never see

Paley Library sees thousands of undergraduates each day in its information commons, books stacks, and study spaces, but there are thousands more we rarely see. Since librarians feel strongly that the materials and services we provide both enrich a students’ intellectual life and improve their educational outcomes, we are always looking for new ways to reach students.

On February 10th of this year, a small group of librarians interested in data and statistics met with an undergraduate senior majoring in Risk Management and Insurance (Human Resources track) in the Fox School of Business, Andrea Markofski. She caught the attention of one of our group by commenting on social media about her enthusiasm for a fresh new dataset from the Census Bureau. Since we have little contact with students from this major, we invited her to speak to us about her experiences at Temple. An articulate, candid, and personable individual, Andrea offered us the chance to speak with a student who rarely uses the library. This demographic group is both hard to reach and important for us to understand.

Andrea explained that undergraduate business students take an introductory course in risk management and promising students are encouraged (“tapped”) to major in risk management. Next comes a course that is known informally as the “risk management boot camp” which is a treacherous bridge that stops about half the students who attempt to cross over. Those who succeed select separate tracks such as actuarial studies or employee benefits. Andrea chose the benefits track and became an enthusiastic student.

Risk management is known as a major that leads to good entry-level jobs and great career prospects. When asked about the changes she had seen in the program since her freshman year, Stephanie explained that the program seems to be easing the demands of the boot camp so that more students can major in risk management. Although she enjoys her studies and is looking forward to a career in the field, she is aware of students in her program who are unenthusiastic and simply want to find a good job on graduation. To do her work, Stephanie favors studying in the Tech Center as long as she can find a separate cubicle.

Much of Andrea’s course work involves building and manipulating Excel spreadsheets (though she remembers using other programs occasionally). Her discussion of using linked tables left us with the impression that she was a sophisticated Excel user. The datasets that she uses in her course work are made available in her classes so that she has little need to search for additional data. Though she writes papers that require scholarly sources, she seemed unfamiliar with many of the databases we would suggest that she use. She commented that the databases we described – Risk Abstracts, Business Source Complete, or ABI/INFORM Complete – probably would have saved her some of the time she spent wading through Google search results.

There were some other resources we mentioned in order to gauge her familiarity with the library. As a power user of Excel we wondered if she knew of Lynda.com, a subscription database of tutorials on computer programming and productivity software. We also wondered if she had ever used Refworks, one of the citation management programs to which we subscribe. In neither case had she heard of these resources. For citation management, she turned to RefMan or other free citation management tools recommended by her professors. We were surprised to learn that she was unaware of annual Temple Analytics Challenge in the Fox School because she appeared to be an ideal candidate for the competition.

We would like to thank Andrea Markofski for speaking with us. We learned a lot from her and we look forward to speaking to more students in the future. If you have suggestions about how we improve our services, please feel free to contact us.

Fred Rowland, Rick Lezenby

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Celebrate National Library Week at the Libraries

Today marks the beginning of National Library Week, a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April. It is a time to celebrate the contributions of our nation’s libraries and librarians and to promote library use and support.


How You Can Celebrate with TU Libraries

  • Stop by our table in Paley Library and the Student Center for more information about library resources and services, as well as some fun stress-relief activities, giveaways, candy, and a chance to tell us why YOU are thankful for the Libraries.

Library Table Hours
Tuesday, April 11 from 2:00–4:00 PM in Paley Library
Wednesday, April 12 11:00 AM–1:00 PM in the Student Center
Thursday, April 13 from 2:00–4:00 PM in Paley Library

  • Our Question of the Week board asks why YOU are thankful for the Libraries—what will you say?
  • Follow #ThankTULibraries stories on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram and add your own!

What Library Resources Are TUL Staff Members Most Thankful For?

“I’m most thankful for the library’s video collection, as I’ve frequently used it for my film work. I’m also thankful for librarians who often direct me to the resources I need when I’m feeling overwhelmed and can’t find them.” –Gary Kramer, Publicity Manager, Temple University Press

“I am thankful for Interlibrary loan. I have gotten great books for both leisure and professional reading in the last few months that my local public library doesn’t have.” –Jenny Pierce, Head of Research, Education, and Outreach, Ginsburg Health Sciences Library

“Our committed, creative, & talented staff.” –Joe Lucia, Dean of Libraries

“Access to full text journals! We have so many.” –Lauri Fennell, Reference/Patron Services, Ginsburg Health Sciences Library

“I’m thrilled that we now have online access to the Philadelphia Inquirer for the entire 20th century (we had a gap of about 60 years previously). This is a huge improvement in access for students and faculty who are researching Philadelphia history in a wide range of disciplines. One faculty member told me it was the best news he’d heard in months!” –Rebecca Lloyd, Reference Librarian

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Gospels, Spirituals, and More!

Girl with a dove.

Photo Eddie van W.

Gospels, Spirituals, and More!
with Dr. J. Donald Dumpson and Friends

Wednesday, April 19th
12:00pm – 12:50pm
Paley Library Lecture Hall
Light refreshments served. Boyer recital credit given.

Gospel Songs led by singers from the Arch Street Presbyterian Church
Valerie Gay, soprano
Markus Beam, baritone
Dr. Clipper Erickson, piano
Dr. Rollo Dilworth, composer, pianist
Dr. Jay Fluellen, composer, pianist

We are pleased to present one of Philadelphia’s foremost leaders in music, Dr. J. Donald Dumpson, to perform this moving and fun repertoire. Tap your feet, sing along, or just relax and enjoy!

Spirituals and Gospel music are unique African American contributions to the musical culture of the United States. Their origins lie in the syncretizing of African traditions with the Christian culture of Europe. Songs of African American slaves combine the hymns of America, England, and elements of African singing, such as call-and-response between single singers and a group to create a poignant and uplifting repertoire. After the Civil War, groups such as Fisk University’s Jubilee Singers toured America and Europe with performances by a professional choir of arranged spirituals, and efforts to codify and arrange this expressive genre of music began.  Composers such as  the English Creole composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor (1875-1912) and Canadian-born African American composer R. Nathaniel Dett (1882-1943) incorporated material from Spirituals as the basis for their works. Gospel music initially began for religious worship in the late 19th and early 20th century. Unlike the primarily vocal Spirituals, gospel music incorporated instrumental elements from the start, including everything from the banjo to the piano to the organ. Significant overlap with the ascent of jazz is notable, and the two influenced each other. Gospel music incorporates the virtuosity and complexity of jazz and will often showcase the solo singer.  Today, Gospel’s reach and appeal extend far beyond its original use as music intended solely for church, into concert halls, communities, and films.


photo of Dr. Dumpson

Dr. J. Donald Dumpson

Dr. J. Donald Dumpson was minister of music and arts at Bright Hope Baptist Church from 1985- 2010 and founding conductor and artistic director of the Westminster Choir College Jubilee Singers from 1994- 2011. In November 2015, Dr. Dumpson provided choral preparation for the Philadelphia Orchestra’s world premier of Hannibal Lokumbe’s One Land, One River, One People conducted by Maestro Yannick Nézet-Séguin. He also curated regional singers for the World Meeting of Families Festival of Families Celebration performance featuring Aretha Franklin, Andrea Bocelli, Juanes, the Philadelphia Orchestra, and the Philadelphia Heritage Chorale. The chorale also appeared with jazz bassist Christian McBride at the Merriam Theatre in The Movement Revisited featuring Sonya Sanchez as Rosa Parks and Rev. Dr. Alyn Waller as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dr. Dumpson has served as the co-producer of An Evening of Stars, formally known as the Lou Rawls Parade of Stars, benefiting the United Negro College Fund, Inc. For one of the syndicated broadcasts, which honored Quincy Jones, he secured the talents of Bill Cosby, Oprah Winfrey, Stevie Wonder, Whoopi Goldberg, Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds, Denyce Graves, Nancy Wilson, Macy Gray, Joss Stone, Yolanda Adams, Monique, Tyler Perry, Kirk Franklin, and many more. For that telecast, Dr. Dumpson accompanied opera diva, Denyce Graves. He made his Carnegie debut in March of 2001 when the Westminster Choir College Jubilee Singers performed Porgy and Bess under the baton of the legendary maestro Skitch Henderson. As musical director of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Chorus, he prepared the chorus for Hannibal Lokumbe’s God, Mississippi, and a Man Called Evers. The New York Times cited the composer’s statement, “this was the best chorus I have ever heard.” He recently prepared a chorus of regional singers the world premier of A Shepherd Among Us also composed by Hannibal Lokumbe and in 2009 was chorus master for the New Jersey State Opera’s production of Porgy and Bess.

photo of Rollo Dilworth

Dr. Rollo Dilworth

Rollo Dilworth is Professor of Choral Music Education and Chair of Music Education and Therapy at Temple University’s Boyer College of Music in Philadelphia, PA.  In addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in choral music education, Dilworth conducts the “Singing Owls” Campus/Community Chorus. His choral publications can be found in the catalogs of Hal Leonard, Colla Voce, and Santa Barbara Music Publishing. Dilworth frequently serves as a guest conductor and/or clinician for festival and all-state choirs throughout the United States and abroad.  He currently serves as Immediate Past Chair of the Board for Chorus America.

Rochelle Ellis received her DMA Voice degree from Rutgers University. She has performed with orchestras throughout the USA, Europe and Asia. Dr. Ellis is on the voice faculty at Westminster Choir College and Princeton University; she conducts the high school Chorale with the Trenton Children’s Chorus; and she serves as the Teaching Artist for opera workshops with The Princeton Festival.

Clipper Erickson

Dr. Clipper Erickson

Clipper Erickson made his debut as a soloist with the Young Musicians Foundation Orchestra at age nineteen in Los Angeles. After studies at The Juilliard School, Yale University, and Indiana University with the renowned British pianist John Ogdon, his interpretations began earning prizes at international competitions including the Busoni, William Kapell, and the American Pianists Association. He has performed as a soloist with orchestra and as a recitalist in venues such as the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., and Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall.  His powerful performances of the great classical repertoire have been described as “colorful,” “powerful” and “exciting.”  In January 2016, Gramophone UK honored Clipper’s disc of the complete piano music of African descent composer Nathaniel Dett, as an editor’s choice, writing: “this historically and musically important release not only fills a crucial catalogue gap but sets reference standards.”  American Record Guide agreed: “Erickson is simply a fabulous pianist, the perfect guide to Dett.”  Clipper teaches at Westminster Conservatory in Princeton and Temple University.

Photo of Dr. Fluellen playing the piano.

Dr. Jay Fluellen

Jay Fluellen, D. M. A. is a Philadelphia born musician, highly sought after as composer pianist, choir director and educator. His doctorate in music composition is from Temple University and his PA certification in K-12 music is from Eastern University. Dr. Fluellen is currently a teacher with the School District of Philadelphia at Northeast High School. He has been commissioned by various performers and institutions, including; Orchestra 2001, Philadelphia Jazz Project, Opera Company of Philadelphia, Network for New Music, Relâche, Singing City, Bucks County Choral Society, The Settlement School of Music, Since January 1997, he has been an organist /choir director at the historic African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas, Fr. Martini Shaw, rector.

Photo of Valerie Gay

Valerie Gay

Valerie V. Gay is an active performer as a solo recitalist and multi-genre vocalist, and is a member of the EVER Ensemble. Val especially enjoys presenting recitals which feature lesser known composers, especially women and composers of color. Some of her recent performing highlights include singing in concert with renowned soprano Kathleen Battle, and being featured in the preview and world premiere of Hannibal Lokumbe’s Can You Hear God Crying and A Shepherd Among Us, respectively. As a student of Dr. Christine Anderson, Val received a MM and Professional Studies Certificate in Vocal Performance from Temple University.

Find out more!

Darden, Bob. Nothing but Love in God’s Water: Black Sacred music from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement.  University Park, PA: Penn State Press, 2014.  Web access.

Dixon, Robert M. W., John Godrich, et al.  Blues & Gospel Records, 1890-1943. New York : Oxford University Press, 1997. 4th ed. Paley Stacks.  ML156.4.B6 D59 1997

Graham, Sandra Jean . “Spiritual.” Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 31 Mar. 2017.

Hillsman, Joan R. Gospel Music : an African American Art Form. Washington, D.C. : Middle Atlantic Regional Press, c1990. Paley Stacks. ML3187.H54 1990

Horne, Aaron. Keyboard Music of Black Composers : a bibliography.  Westport, Conn. ; London : Greenwood Press, 1992.  Paley Stacks.  ML128.B45H68 1992

Marovich, Robert M. A City Called Heaven [electronic resource] : Chicago and the Birth of Gospel Music. Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2015]  Web Access.  ML3187

Moore, Allan, ed. The Cambridge  Companion to Blues and Gospel Music. New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Web Access and Paley Stacks. ML3521 .C36 2002

Robinson-Martin, Trineice. So You Want to Sing Gospel : a Guide for Performers. Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield, [2017]  Paley Stacks.  MT820 .R72 2017

*****************************************

Beyond the Notes is Temple University Libraries and the Center for the Performing and Cinematic Arts Concert and Performance Series.

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MERLOT Adds New OER Search Feature

MERLOT is a well-known repository of openly accessible learning content produced and shared by higher education faculty. With its thousands of learning objects, MERLOT is considered a reliable source of quality Open Educational Resources (OER).

Faculty are sometimes challenged to find OER that fits their course. To enhance their ability to locate OER, MERLOT has developed a new feature called “Smart Search”. It extends access to online learning materials well beyond MERLOT’s curated and peer reviewed collection.  Smart Search helps to answer the pervasive and nagging question, “Where can I find OERs?”

Smart Search searches the World Wide Web specifically for the kinds of learning materials typically found in MERLOT. It uses a proprietary MERLOT user profile design to find the newest and most popular learning materials on the web. While these web items are not reviewed or curated as is the MERLOT resources, searches can recommend materials they find for future review.

Smart Search is easy to use. From the MERLOT home page go to the search feature:

screenshot of merlot search box

Start with the MERLOT search utility

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then MERLOT will indicate you have a choice of three options for finding content:

screenshot of the merlot search options

MERLOT prompts for one of three different searches

 

 

 

 

 

Choosing the Web search option will result in up to 100 websites with potential OER content on the search topic:

screenshot of MERLOT search results screen

MERLOT search results display up to 100 web sites

 

 

 

 

 

As part of Temple University Libraries celebration of Open Education Week, we encourage all instructors to visit MERLOT and consider ways in which OER could be used to offer students affordable learning material. For more information on locating OER resources, using existing library content or other resources as affordable learning materials contact Steven Bell, Associate University Librarian.

The Beggar’s Opera

Beyond the Notes : Temple Library’s Noontime Concert Series

Wednesday, March 8th


12:00pm


Paley Library Lecture Hall

Boyer recital credit given. Light refreshments served.

On Wednesday, March 15, Paley Library’s Beyond the Notes concert series will present a preview of The Beggar’s Opera. This work (1728) is the comic masterpiece of John Gay (1685-1732), an English poet and playwright with a flair for the farcical, and Johann Christoph Pepusch (1667-1752), a German-born composer who arranged familiar tunes of the day for the songs.

Hogarth painting

Painting by William Hogarth. Photo by Jean Louis Mazleres

The Beggar’s Opera functions as a satire on multiple levels. Musically and dramatically speaking, it pokes fun at the stilted conventions of Italian opera seria. This genre, which was in vogue in English theaters of the time, had in George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) a great exponent and a dominating musical influence. Despite England’s own native musical traditions, the German-born Handel’s continental style almost overwhelmed his adopted country. Opera seria, as a rule, was based on classical mythology or grand historical subjects. For this work, Gay created a tale set in his own time, populated by figures such as the womanizing highwayman Macheath and other social outcasts. As a ballad opera, a theatrical style based on brief songs interspersed with spoken dialogue, this work sidesteps both conventional recitative – speech-like singing accompanied only by harpsichord, meant to move dramatic action forward – and the virtuosic arias designed around creating opportunities for singers to display their technical skill that comprise so much of opera seria. In its place were tunes known to the public – hymns, street ballads, even tunes by famous composers.

Politically, the work takes aim at the career of Robert Walpole (1676-1745), considered the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. More than a little personal envy may be at play here. At the time, the South Sea Company had a reputation as a smart investment.  But the bubble burst and Gay lost everything, whereas Walpole made a massive profit by selling shares he owned.  An ensuing investigation into the company lead to his becoming First Lord of the Treasury in 1721, beginning his rise to power. In any case, the work made a notable impression on the public and the literati, with none missing the fact that it makes people in financial trades the target of its invective.

The Beggar’s Opera made its mark, and in the twentieth century numerous musicians and people of the theater tried their hands at reworking it. The most famous of these is surely The Threepenny Opera (1928) by playwright Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) and composer Kurt Weill (1900-1950), featuring the famous song “Mack the Knife.” Others who have made their own adaptations include composer Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) in 1948, conductor Richard Bonynge (b. 1930) and composer Douglas Gamley (1924-1998) in 1981, and playwright Stephen Jeffreys (b. 1950) as recently as 2008. There is surely something in the work that speaks to so many people across time and throughout the world that is still fascinates after hundreds of years. We at the library hope you will enjoy this performance with us!

Beyond the Notes is supported by the Boyer College, Temple University Libraries, and the Presidential Humanities and Arts Research fund.

 

Read more!

The Beggar’s Opera available online through the Library!

The beggar’s opera to which is prefixed the musick to each song / John Gay. [Hamburg, Germany] : Tredition, [2012?]  Paley Stacks ML50.7 .B43 2012

Works of John Gay at Project Gutenberg

Poems of John Gay, edited by John Underhill. London, New York, George Routledge & Sons, E.P. Dutton & Co., [n.d.]  Paley Stacks PR3473.A1 U5

Bevis, Richard W. English drama : restoration and the eighteenth century, 1660-1789. London ; New York : Longman, 1988.  Paley Stacks PR691.B48 1988

Ed. Catie Gill: Theatre and culture in early modern England, 1650-1737 : from Leviathan to Licensing Act. Farnham, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2010.  Paley Stacks  PR698.S46 T47 2010

Gollapudi, Aparna. Moral reform in comedy and culture, 1696-1747 [electronic resource]. Farnham, Surrey ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2011.  Web Access  PR708.C6 G65 2011eb

 

Robert Pegg is a PhD candidate in Music Composition. He is a student of Dr. Maurice Wright.

Posted in Uncategorized

The Beggar’s Opera

Beyond the Notes : Temple Library’s Noontime Concert Series

Wednesday, March 8th


12:00pm


Paley Library Lecture Hall

Boyer recital credit given. Light refreshments served.

On Wednesday, March 15, Paley Library’s Beyond the Notes concert series will present a preview of The Beggar’s Opera. This work (1728) is the comic masterpiece of John Gay (1685-1732), an English poet and playwright with a flair for the farcical, and Johann Christoph Pepusch (1667-1752), a German-born composer who arranged familiar tunes of the day for the songs.

Hogarth painting

Painting by William Hogarth. Photo by Jean Louis Mazleres

The Beggar’s Opera functions as a satire on multiple levels. Musically and dramatically speaking, it pokes fun at the stilted conventions of Italian opera seria. This genre, which was in vogue in English theaters of the time, had in George Frideric Handel (1685-1759) a great exponent and a dominating musical influence. Despite England’s own native musical traditions, the German-born Handel’s continental style almost overwhelmed his adopted country. Opera seria, as a rule, was based on classical mythology or grand historical subjects. For this work, Gay created a tale set in his own time, populated by figures such as the womanizing highwayman Macheath and other social outcasts. As a ballad opera, a theatrical style based on brief songs interspersed with spoken dialogue, this work sidesteps both conventional recitative – speech-like singing accompanied only by harpsichord, meant to move dramatic action forward – and the virtuosic arias designed around creating opportunities for singers to display their technical skill that comprise so much of opera seria. In its place were tunes known to the public – hymns, street ballads, even tunes by famous composers.

Politically, the work takes aim at the career of Robert Walpole (1676-1745), considered the first Prime Minister of Great Britain. More than a little personal envy may be at play here. At the time, the South Sea Company had a reputation as a smart investment.  But the bubble burst and Gay lost everything, whereas Walpole made a massive profit by selling shares he owned.  An ensuing investigation into the company lead to his becoming First Lord of the Treasury in 1721, beginning his rise to power. In any case, the work made a notable impression on the public and the literati, with none missing the fact that it makes people in financial trades the target of its invective.

The Beggar’s Opera made its mark, and in the twentieth century numerous musicians and people of the theater tried their hands at reworking it. The most famous of these is surely The Threepenny Opera (1928) by playwright Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) and composer Kurt Weill (1900-1950), featuring the famous song “Mack the Knife.” Others who have made their own adaptations include composer Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) in 1948, conductor Richard Bonynge (b. 1930) and composer Douglas Gamley (1924-1998) in 1981, and playwright Stephen Jeffreys (b. 1950) as recently as 2008. There is surely something in the work that speaks to so many people across time and throughout the world that is still fascinates after hundreds of years. We at the library hope you will enjoy this performance with us!

Beyond the Notes is supported by the Boyer College, Temple University Libraries, and the Presidential Humanities and Arts Research fund.

 

Read more!

The Beggar’s Opera available online through the Library!

The beggar’s opera to which is prefixed the musick to each song / John Gay. [Hamburg, Germany] : Tredition, [2012?]  Paley Stacks ML50.7 .B43 2012

Works of John Gay at Project Gutenberg

Poems of John Gay, edited by John Underhill. London, New York, George Routledge & Sons, E.P. Dutton & Co., [n.d.]  Paley Stacks PR3473.A1 U5

Bevis, Richard W. English drama : restoration and the eighteenth century, 1660-1789. London ; New York : Longman, 1988.  Paley Stacks PR691.B48 1988

Ed. Catie Gill: Theatre and culture in early modern England, 1650-1737 : from Leviathan to Licensing Act. Farnham, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2010.  Paley Stacks  PR698.S46 T47 2010

Gollapudi, Aparna. Moral reform in comedy and culture, 1696-1747 [electronic resource]. Farnham, Surrey ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2011.  Web Access  PR708.C6 G65 2011eb

 

Robert Pegg is a PhD candidate in Music Composition. He is a student of Dr. Maurice Wright.

Posted in Uncategorized

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon @ Temple

Temple University Libraries are hosting an Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on Friday, March 3 from 1:30-5:00 PM in the Digital Scholarship Center. We will start with tutorials for beginner Wikipedians at 1:30 PM, but we invite you to drop in at any time and join us!

The Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is an international communal updating of Wikipedia content on subjects related to art and feminism. Universities and cultural institutions around the city of Philadelphia are hosting edit-a-thons throughout the month of March, where participants will gather in one place to edit, add, and improve Wikipedia entries.

Register here, arrive with your laptop or device, power cord, and ideas for entries. It’s that simple. We will provide tutorials for beginner Wikipedians, reference materials, and refreshments.

Since 2014, over 280 Art+Feminism Edit-a-thons have taken place across the world, creating and improving an estimated 4,600 articles. Join us to broaden that reach in 2017! 

#artandfeminism

 

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Celebrate Fair Use Week 2017

This week is Fair Use Week 2017, an annual celebration coordinated by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) to encourage conversations around fair use. In the United States, fair use refers to both copyright laws and the exceptions that allow us to use copyrighted materials without permission. Students, teachers, scholars, librarians, and many others interact with copyrighted materials on a daily basis, and the principle of fair use facilitates honoring intellectual property rights and accommodating the flexible needs of academic settings, emerging technologies, and free expression.

Temple University Libraries is joining the conversation with two programs this week. Please join us!

Tuesday, February 21, 2:00 PM
ACRL Webcast, “Using Fair Use to Preserve and Share Disappearing Government Information: A Guide for Rogue Librarians”
The Libraries will host a viewing of this ACRL webinar that will introduce fair use as an equitable doctrine designed to support librarianship and prepare participants to apply fair use in their own communities’ work.

Wednesday, February 22, 5:00 pm
Can I Use That? A Workshop on Copyright and Fair Use
Resident Librarian Anastasia Chiu will host drop-in workshop that will cover basic principles of copyright, fair use, and using sources ethically, in a competitive question-and-answer game show format. There are prizes for winners!
Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/can-i-use-that-a-workshop-on-copyright-fair-use-tickets-31946843870

Both programs will be held in the Digital Scholarship Center on the Ground Floor of Paley Library.

Want to learn more about fair use in the meantime? Check out the Libraries’ research guide about using copyrighted content in the classroom.

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Highlighting, Measuring, and Managing Your Research

Are you a graduate student or faculty member? Do you want to understand the current scholarly landscape for measuring, highlighting, and sharing your research?

zotero   academia   webofscience

Tools like Scopus, Web of Science, and Journal Citation Reports provide indicators of research productivity. Portals like Academia.edu, ResearchGate, Humanities Commons, and Google Profiles allow researchers to share their work and network with other scholars. Zotero, EndNote, and Mendeley make organizing and sharing sources a snap. Publishing in open access venues and posting your research to scholarly repositories can enhance your research impact. Familiarity with these new tools and strategies helps researchers find colleagues, collaborators, and funders, as well as facilitates the tenure and promotion process.

The Temple University Libraries will be offering a series of four workshops in the Digital Scholarship Center on highlighting, measuring, and managing your research. Bring your laptop or borrow one in the DSC.

scopus   researchgate   mendeley

Workshop 1: Managing Your Research
Wednesday, March 29, 11-12, DSC

  • Attendees will gain an understanding of the features of these reference management and sharing tools and their areas of overlap with academic social networks. They will understand some key functional and disciplinary considerations when selecting the proper tool.
  • Register for Workshop 1

Workshop 2: Developing Your Scholarly Profile
Wednesday, April 5, 11-12, DSC

  • The professional and ethical uses of academic social networks such as ResearchGate and Academia as well as preferences of scholars in different disciplines will be explored.  We will talk about ORCiD and other researcher IDs and how they can be used to enhance your online profile.
  • Register for Workshop 2

Workshop 3: Amplifying Your Research Impact
Wednesday, April 12, 11-12, DSC

  • Attendees will learn how to effectively promote and share their research online. We will discuss best practices for using social media, explain how to deposit research outputs in disciplinary repositories, and explore tools and platforms that can help authors expand their readership.
  • Register for Workshop 3

Workshop 4: Measuring Research Impact
Wednesday, April 19, 11-12, DSC

  • Attendees will gain strategies for identifying and measuring their research impact using available online tools. Important buzzwords like citation metrics, impact factors, and the h-index will be explained and applied in a variety of disciplinary contexts.
  • Register for Workshop 4
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