Shannon Merlino, Baroque Violin, and Music from our Childhoods

Music of Bach and Vivaldi

Led by Shannon Merlino

Wednesday, November 14th

12:00pm – 12:50pm

Paley Library Lecture Hall

Light refreshments served. Boyer recital credit given.

 

Photo of Merlino playing viola

Shannon Merlino

Violinist and violist Shannon Merlino, a Philadelphia native, describes the theme of this recital as revisiting Baroque violin music that is most often used for pedagogical purposes for students first learning to play violin. Merlino references Itzhak Perlman’s album Concertos from my Childhood. That album consists of the famous virtuoso violinist’s performances of didactic pieces composed for violin students.

There are many pieces that were originally composed to be teaching tools or most commonly used as such, but that still can be captivating as concert pieces. I have my own experience of this, having taken my first piano lessons as a college student, in which I learned to play several of J.S. Bach’s 2-part inventions and Bartok’s Mikrokosmos, works written for students. Having already studied music theory certainly made my interpretation of these pieces different than they would have been if I had learned them as a child. Still, my interpretations were limited by my technical skill. These pieces have all been recorded by esteemed professionals, who bring new interpretations. While originally for pedagogical purposes, these works continue to attract the attention of scholars in the 21st century for non-pedagogical reasons (see, for example, Väisälä 2009; Hajdu 2008).

1870 painting of Bach and his family

Johann Sebastian Bach accompanies his family at the harpsichord. Toby Edward Rosenthal , 1870.

None of this is to belittle the joy that children and their families and friends can feel from learning these pieces their own way, even if their interpretations are often less nuanced. On some level, one can argue that these pieces should not require such nuance. Unlike a typical classical concert, a youth recital is more about celebrating the performer than it is about the composer. And much music written for students is not intended for performance at all, but rather as a means for one to practice a specific skill.

But it is another matter the repertoire for this recital, which will consist of Baroque music which was intended to have specific performance practice that is not often followed when students learn the music today. Merlino notes that “beginning players learn Baroque music, and without performance practice – ornamentation, continuo, and the like – the repertoire is relegated to “didactic” status.” In the Baroque era, musicians were often expected to add their own embellishments, such as trills or other flourishes (Although some, such as Couperin who was featured in a Beyond the Notes concert earlier this season, did provide their own.) So when children learn to play violin by using these pieces without such embellishments, not only is there less complex interpretation, there are fewer notes. In this program, we can expect to hear these pieces performed with a more historically informed practice, which should make them especially exciting.

Revisiting music from our childhood is not just for musicians. Most of us have music that was meaningful to us as children, that we feel as if we have grown out of, but is still part of who we are. There is some Baroque music, such as Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons, which most likely many listeners would have grown up hearing, if only from commercials or soundtracks, whether or not they learned to play an instrument. There is still much to gained from taking it seriously the soundtracks of our childhoods and listening in more closely.

Children’s music itself has so far received somewhat limited attention from musicologists and music theorists. This may be changing, however. In fact, there is an effort is currently underway to start a Childhood and Youth Studies Study Group within the American Musicological Society. It seems then, that this concert is coming at the perfect time!

Bios:

Born and raised in the greater Philadelphia area, Shannon Merlino began violin studies at the age of nine, earning her Bachelor of Music degree in Violin Performance at Rutgers University as a student of Matthew Reichert and Lenuta Ciulei. She continued her violin studies as a scholarship student at Mannes College, earning a Master of Music degree while studying with Lewis Kaplan. Finally she completed doctoral coursework under Mikhail Kopelman at Rutgers University. After making the decision to focus primarily on viola, she began private studies with Kerri Ryan and is now in doctoral studies at Temple University. Her competition awards include second place in both the Miami String Quartet and South Orange Symphony competitions, and her solo credits include several appearances with the Lustig Dance Company. She has appeared in recitals as both soloist and chamber musician throughout the New York City metropolitan area, and maintains an active freelance performance career in the Philadelphia area as both modern and Baroque violist. Ms. Merlino has also given pre-concert talks on viola technique and pedagogy, most notably at the Library of Congress. Ms. Merlino performs on a viola by Clifford Hoing and a bow by Malcolm Taylor of W. E. Hill and Sons.

References:

Hajdu, Andre. “A Galaxy Called ‘Mikrokosmos’: A Composer’s View.” Tempo 62, no. 243 (2008): 16-35. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40072752.

Väisälä, Olli. “Bach’s Inventions: Figuration, Register, Structure, and the “Clear Way to Develop Inventions Properly”.” Music Theory Spectrum 31, no. 1 (2009): 101-52. doi:10.1525/mts.2009.31.1.101.

 

Ben Safran is a Ph.D. candidate in music at Temple University, where his dissertation focuses on contemporary classical composers’ uses of social justice and political themes within concert music. His compositions have been performed by various ensembles and musicians across the United States

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The Gender Pay Gap: Oct. 15 Author Talk with Yasemin Besen-Cassino

Cover for Yasemin Besen-Cassino's book, The Cost of Being a GirlOn Monday, October 15, Temple University Press author Yasemin Besen-Cassino will be at Temple University’s Paley Library to discuss her book, The Cost of Being a Girl: Working Teens and the Origins of the Gender Wage Gap.

According to her research, the gender pay gap starts with part-time work in the teen years and persists into adulthood.

Yasemin Besen-Cassino is a Professor of Sociology at Montclair State University. Her research focuses on work, gender, and youth and has appeared in many sociology journals such as Contexts, Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Theory & Society, NWSAJ, and Education & Society. In addition, her work has been featured in many popular venues such as the Washington Post, the Guardian, The Atlantic, CNN, MTV, Fortune, and Ms. Magazine, and many others.

Photograph of Professor Besen-Cassion

Professor Besen-Cassino

Want to learn more about gender pay gap ahead of Monday’s program? Read about how the gender pay gap affects teens on The Lily and check out Dr. Besen-Cassino’s op-eds on equal pay in The Guardian and in Ms. Magazine.  

This program will be held at 2:00 PM in the Paley Library Lecture Hall. As always, our programs are free and open to all. Registration requested.

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Zach Brock, Jazz Violin, and Genre

Photo of Zach Brock.

Zach Brock, jazz violinist

Beyond the Notes Presents:

Boyer Artist-in-Residence Zach Brock, Jazz Violinist

Tuesday, October 23rd, 12:00pm – 12:50pm

Paley Library Lecture Hall

 

While a fixture of the classical concert hall, violins have also been used in Jazz since the 1930’s. In addition to amplification and a tendency toward bowing over plucking, jazz violin playing can also include extended techniques, strategies to alter or distort the violin sound that are not part of typical playing conventions. These have unique sounds that are often not at all traditionally “violin-like.”

Grammy-award-winning Zach Brock, who studied violin performance at Northwestern University, is regarded as among the top jazz violinists of our time. Yet Brock also incorporates musical ideas and techniques that may sound less like Jazz than like “classical” composers such as Bartok, with minimalist and post-minimalist sonic gestures as well. Some of Brock’s particular performance practices are uncommon among jazz violinists. For example, jazz violin often requires electronic amplification for purposes of balance with other instruments, but videos of Brock most often showing him playing without any amplification. In addition, note that jazz violin has traditionally been played with the bow [arco] rather than plucked with fingers [pizzicato] (Glaser et al. 2003), but a number of Brock’s performances do make use of pizzicato.

The ability to “cross over” between genres is not to be taken for granted. While jazzy sounds have been incorporated into American classical music since the early 20th century, and the tradition of improvisation within classical music stretches back many centuries, typical classical musicians who have not had experience playing Jazz would most likely find the transition to playing jazz difficult. Playing jazz requires a distinct skill set and technique. There are now a large number of teaching materials specifically dedicated to students learning jazz strings (Alibrio-Curran 2005). There are also sociocultural and especially racial implications to crossing over stylistic boundaries, which are increasingly attracting the attention of music scholars (James 2017).

But genre lines are already fuzzy. What is “Jazz” as a genre? German philosopher Theodor Adorno clumped Jazz in with popular music ([1941] 2002); strangely, even though he acknowledged that Jazz is more complex in some ways—such as rhythm—than classical music, he nevertheless maintained that all pop music is nevertheless rigid and mechanical. Scott DeVeaux notes that Jazz has also been referred to as “America’s classical music,” and is sometimes seen, like classical music, as a dying art form ([1991] 1998). What gets to count as Jazz has always been up for debate. The modernist tradition of “free Jazz” is sometimes not thought of as Jazz at all (DeVeaux [1991] 1998), but why not? DeVeaux argues that Jazz’s present struggles and decline in popularity should not be thought of as a musical or aesthetic problem, but rather one of historical framing.

So how about Jazz violin? Jazz in textbooks is sometimes given a clear, linear history, in which it is oriented more toward African American than European culture (DeVeaux [1991] 1998). This is not wrong, but—like the related notion of seeing Jazz as synonymous with “Black art music”—it is too simplistic. Violin, of course, can be thought of as one of the most quintessential European instruments. So if we know that Jazz violin has been around since the 1930’s, that could be a clue to help us to revisit the history of Jazz as more complex than we would often acknowledge. Once we do that, instead of finding a clear way forward for the genre to proceed, we can accept that its future will be as divergent and multi-layered as its past.

 

References:

Adorno, Theodor. ([1941] 2002). “On Popular Music,” reprinted in Essays on Music, Richard Leppert, ed., 437-479. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Alibrio-Curran, Frances. 2005. “From Whence They Came: A Tribute to Early String Improvisational Materials.” American String Teacher 55, 1 (February): 68-70. https://doi-org.libproxy.temple.edu/10.1177/000313130505500110

DeVeaux, Scott. ([1991] 1998), “Constructing the Jazz Tradition: Jazz Historiography,” Black American Literature Forum 25, no. 3 (Fall): 525-60, reprinted in The Jazz Cadence of American Culture, New York: Columbia University Press, 484-514.

Glaser, Matt, Alyn Shipton, and Anthony Barnett. 2003. “Violin, jazz.” Grove Music Online. Accessed 15 Sep. 2018. http:////www.oxfordmusiconline.com/grovemusic/view/10.1093/gmo/9781561592630.001.0001/omo-9781561592630-e-2000468100.

James, Robin. 2017. “Is the post- in post-identity the post- in post-genre?” Popular Music 36 (1): 21-32.

Zack Brock. n.d. “Home – Zack Brock.” Accessed 18 September 2018. https://www.zachbrock.com/home

 

Ben Safran is a Ph.D. candidate in music at Temple University, where his dissertation focuses on contemporary classical composers’ uses of social justice and political themes within concert music. His compositions have been performed by various ensembles and musicians across the United States.

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Speak Out During Banned Books Week, Sept. 23–29

This week is Banned Books Week, an annual American Library Association (ALA) event that celebrates the freedom to read and asks us to speak out against the tide of censorship.

Every year, books in schools and libraries are challenged, meaning a person or group has requested their removal or restriction. The reasons for these challenges range from objections to explicit content, offensive language, age-inappropriate material, and more. Yet, most challenges are unsuccessful due to the hard work of librarians, teachers, students, and community members who support and promote our freedom to openly access information and literature.

Check out our display on the first floor of Paley Library, across from the service desk. The featured books have all been challenged at some point in libraries and schools, along with many other frequently challenged books. Consider checking one out and support your freedom to seek and express ideas.


Join the Conversation for a Chance to Win Library Swag!

Tweet us your favorite passage or quote from a banned book with the hashtag #BannedBooksWeek for a chance to win one of of the Libraries’ new drawstring bags! We’ll be choosing a few lucky winners throughout the week.

 

 

 

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Start the Music! Let the Party Begin!

Joyce Lindorff at the harpsichord

Dr. Joyce Lindorff, Professor of Keyboard

 

Couperin Birthday Celebration!

Wednesday, September 26th, 2018

12:00pm – 12:50pm

Paley Library Lecture Hall

Light refreshments served. Boyer recital credit given.

 

 

 

The opening concert of the 2018-19 Beyond the Notes concert series, features Dr. Joyce Lindorff, Boyer Professor of Keyboard, leading a birthday celebration for François Couperin, marking 350 years since his birth.  François Couperin, like Johann Sebastian Bach, was part of a large family of music-makers. For example, Couperin’s uncle was also a noted composer, and his cousin Armand-Louis was especially noted as an organist, but François was sometimes referred to as “Couperin Le Grand” to set him apart from the rest of his family. Recognized as a leading French composer of the 17th century, Couperin’s musical textures have continued to inspire musicians and composers in the centuries since his death. For example, Ravel’s Le Tambeau de Couperin, a solo piano with an orchestral version, is a concert staple, and is likely more familiar to the typical concertgoer than any piece of Couperin himself. Nevertheless, music like the Pièces de Clavecin features a palette that is distinctive, lush, sometimes witty, and sometimes harmonically adventurous.

Picture of harpsichord

1742 Louis Bellot harpsichord, Paris. Photo courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Couperin is especially known for his music for harpsichord. Unlike its most famous successor the piano, the harpsichord is a keyboard instrument in which the strings are plucked rather than hit. In addition to an altogether different sound quality, a major difference is that when a musician presses a key with more or less force, it will not change the dynamic [volume] of the note as it does on the piano. This means that the composer and performer must control the feel of each section of music without having a direct means to control how loud or soft each note is. Instead, our overall experience of the music will be shaped by other means, such as texture and tempo (speed). The density of writing will shape our experience of the intensity of the music rather than volume.

 

CD Cover ArtDr. Joyce Lindorff, professor of keyboard at Boyer, released a CD earlier this year of her performances of Couperin’s L’Art de Toucher le Clavecin. Lindorff’s CD-liner notes offer information about Couperin’s attitude toward pedagogy and performance:

“Couperin is a commanding presence, providing precise fingering for difficult passages in his first book of Pièces de clavecin, keyboard exercises, and a detailed table of ornaments, which he insisted be executed exactly as he wrote them. Rather than trusting players of his unmeasured preludes to interpret the customary minimalist French notation, Couperin instead provides richly detailed templates to be played with freedom. And in marked contrast to modern teaching methods, he advises that young students never practice in the teacher’s absence.”

At that time, music students would have been trained in improvisation far more than now. The level of detail that a composer would notate would be far less, and the musician would be expected to know how to embellish and interpret the music that was written. Rather than playing merely the notes on the page, musicians would add ornaments, or musical flourishes, such as rapid alterations between adjacent notes. In today’s world, with so many styles of classical music in circulation and a lack of a common set of conventions in the music being written by contemporary composers, leaving so much up to the interpretation of the performer may not be practical. However, it is unusual that in the 17th century Couperin would have written out the ornaments that he wanted the players to include.

The extent to which a composer ought to exert influence over performers has been a subject of much debate in recent decades. For example, Christopher Small (1998) sees a hierarchical system of power within orchestral music with the composer at the top. This privileging of the composer allows for a sometimes-oppressive musical canon to emerge, from which composers with less privileged identities, such as most female and non-white composers, would be excluded (Citron 1992). In December, Dr. Lindorff hosted a symposium at the library on such issues, which are becoming an increasingly large part of the historical study of music.

What would this mean in the 17th century? A prevailing view is that the modern idea of the “master composer” is a product of 19th century German Romanticism (Chua 1999). While this may be true, listening to the music of Couperin gives us a chance to see how such issues and differences of opinion would have played out even in earlier centuries. While his attitude suggests an unusual degree of control for his time, when listening to [the CD of] Lindorff’s performance, the listener is struck by the sense of freedom, and often leisure, that manages to prevail. Could the effects of each piece have been achieved with less specificity from the composer? Would that have been better or worse? For sure, the identity dynamics I mentioned above are also worth considering for Couperin’s time as they are in later centuries: could a female composer at the time provide a table of ornaments and insist her pieces be executed exactly as she notated them, as he did? There is never a simple answer to the question of who gets to control art, but listening to Couperin can invite us to keep asking the question in different ways.

To some who have learned a musical instrument, the idea that one must not practice without the teacher present may be hard to fathom. Whether evidence of his desire for control, or perhaps his enormous generosity of time and patience toward his students, it seems that Couperin hoped that his work be played as he intended. No matter the rigidity or flexibility of the composer, Couperin likely did not envision his music being performed in a twenty-first century library lecture hall with a birthday cake in his honor. This performance invites us to experience his music in new and different manners.  So start the music! Let the party begin!

 

References and Further Information:

Denis Arnold & Julie Anne Sadie, “Couperin,” Oxford Companion to Music, Allison Latham, ed. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011).

Daniel K. L. Chua, Absolute Music and the Construction of Meaning (Cambridge University Press,
1999), 1-28.

David Chung, “French Harpsichord Vitality,” Early Music, 41, no. 3 (August 2013), 525–527.
Marcia J. Citron, “The Canon in Practice,” Gender and the Musical Canon (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1993), 190-232.
François Couperin, Art de toucher le clavecin (L’) / Pieces de clavecin, Book 2 – 6th, 8th Ordres (La Raphaèle). Joyce Lindorff, harpsichord. Affetto Recordings, Naxos Music Library, 2018.

Harpsichord [Fr. clavecin; Ger. Cembalo, Kielflügel, Clavicimbel; It. clavicembalo; Sp. clavicémbalo, clavecín].” The Harvard Dictionary of Music, edited by Don Michael Randel, Harvard University Press, 4th edition, 2003. Credo Reference, Accessed 04 Sep. 2018.

Christopher Small, Musicking: The Meanings of Performing and Listening, (Middletown: Wesleyan University Press, 1998), 1-29.

Richard Taruskin, “The Pastness of the Present and the Presence of the Past,” Text & Act: Essays on Music and Performance (New York: Oxford University Press, 1995), 90-154.

Ben Safran is a Ph.D. candidate in music at Temple University, where his dissertation focuses on contemporary classical composers’ uses of social justice and political themes within concert music. His compositions have been performed by various ensembles and musicians across the United States.

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Sights and Sounds of America’s Tenth Man Contest

Christine Woyshner image

Christine Woyshner

 

The 1930s American South was a region of deep racial segregation as the social norms of white supremacy and the terrorism of lynching kept white and black Americans in separate and unequal spheres. The Commission on Interracial Cooperation was an Atlanta-based initiative of white liberals and black leaders to increase understanding and cooperation between the races. Of its many programs, an essay competition called the Tenth Man Contest encouraged white schools to teach black history and culture. At its height, the contest reached 90 school districts in 23 states. Students participating in this program studied numerous textual sources, engaged in a variety of artistic activities, and visited black schools and businesses.

One of the rich legacies of the Tenth Man Contest is an archive of the student papers submitted to the competition. In her article, “‘I feel I am really pleading the cause of my own people’: US southern white students’ study of African-American history and culture in the 1930s through art and the senses” (History of Education, 2018, URL), Professor of Education Christine Woyshner uses this archive to analyze the ways that white high school students understood and interpreted their encounter with the black history, society, and culture. These encounters were often sensuously rich as white students described their visual and aural impressions of African American art, literature, schools and neighborhoods.

I spoke with Christine Woyshner about her article on April 30, 2018.

—Fred Rowland

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Sights and Sounds of America’s Tenth Man Contest

Christine Woyshner image

Christine Woyshner

 

The 1930s American South was a region of deep racial segregation as the social norms of white supremacy and the terrorism of lynching kept white and black Americans in separate and unequal spheres. The Commission on Interracial Cooperation was an Atlanta-based initiative of white liberals and black leaders to increase understanding and cooperation between the races. Of its many programs, an essay competition called the Tenth Man Contest encouraged white schools to teach black history and culture. At its height, the contest reached 90 school districts in 23 states. Students participating in this program studied numerous textual sources, engaged in a variety of artistic activities, and visited black schools and businesses.

One of the rich legacies of the Tenth Man Contest is an archive of the student papers submitted to the competition. In her article, “‘I feel I am really pleading the cause of my own people’: US southern white students’ study of African-American history and culture in the 1930s through art and the senses” (History of Education, 2018, URL), Professor of Education Christine Woyshner uses this archive to analyze the ways that white high school students understood and interpreted their encounter with the black history, society, and culture. These encounters were often sensuously rich as white students described their visual and aural impressions of African American art, literature, schools and neighborhoods.

I spoke with Christine Woyshner about her article on April 30, 2018.

—Fred Rowland

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Access and Opportunity: Recommended Reading for the Libraries’ Fall Programs

This year, the Libraries’ Beyond the Page public programming series is curated around programs exploring access and opportunity. We will consider barriers—whether cultural, financial, physical, or otherwise—that limit opportunities and how we can move toward a more accessible world.

We’ve rounded up a list of reading suggestions to introduce you to our speakers and some of the topics they’ll cover. Check out our recommendations and we hope to see you this fall!

All these programs will be held in the Paley Library Lecture Hall. As always, our programs are free and open to all.

 

Investing in Accessibility

Read about why the U.S. needs more accessible playgrounds and this augmented reality project for which Temple’s Institute on Disabilities received funding from the Knight Foundations’ art and technology Prototype Fund to make live theater more accessible for hearing impaired and non-English speakers.

 

photo of Sara Goldrick-Rab

Sara Goldrick-Rab, photo courtesy Pat Robinson

Sara Goldrick-Rab on Access and Opportunity in Higher Education

Temple Professor and nationally-recognized scholar Sara Goldrick-Rab will speak at the Libraries on Tuesday, September 11 at 6:00 PM. Check out her interview with Trevor Noah and her New York Times op-ed on college students and food insecurity. This recent Philadelphia Inquirer story highlights both Sara’s work and Cherry Pantry, Temple’s campus food pantry.

Other reads to help you prepare for Sara’s talk and conversations about the cost of higher ed include this Fortune article about women’s disproportionate share of student loan debt and the even greater financial burden placed on black women.

 

The Public Arts in Philadelphia

photo of Conrad Benner

Conrad Benner, photo courtesy Peter Murray

Conrad Benner of StreetsDept.com and Cindy M. Ngo of Eat Up The Borders are leading a series of artist talks (Thursday, September 20), artist panels (Monday, September 24), and a wheatpaste workshop (Wednesday, October 3) as part of the Philly Public Arts Forum at the Libraries.

Read about how Conrad got started in Philadelphia Weekly’s profile and in his own words at Caldera Magazine.

Learn more, too, about the local artists visiting the Libraries as part of this series. Michelle Angela Ortiz honors the immigrant experience and uses her art as activism, while Marisa Velázquez-Rivas tells her own story as an artist shining a lights on immigrants, queer communities, and feminism. Other artists include Carol Zou, part of the Michelada Think Tank team, Russell Craig, recipient of a Right of Return fellowship for formerly incarcerated artists to address prison reform, and Keir Johnston, a member of Amber Art and Design, an art collective making public art to enact change. Johnston has also worked on the Mural Arts Philadelphia project honoring late civil rights leader Octavius V. Catto.

Wheatepaste public art by Marisa Velázquez-Rivas

Public art by Marisa Velázquez-Rivas, photo courtesy Conrad Benner

 

 

cover of The Cost of Being a GirlYasemin Besen-Cassino on the Gender Pay Gap

Author Yasemin Besen-Cassino will discuss her book The Cost of Being a Girl on Monday, October 15 at 2:00 PM. Read more about how the gender pay gap affects teens and check out Dr. Besen-Cassino’s op-eds on equal pay in The Guardian and in Ms. Magazine.  

 

 

 

 

Building the 21st Century Library

The Libraries’ symposium series about our new Charles Library continues and will focus this semester on the new library’s potential to transform Temple University’s main campus. Join us Wednesday, October 10th, as we also discuss what steps have been—or could be—taken to make the building more accessible (physically and intellectually) to the campus and surrounding communities.

A rendering of Charles Library

A rendering of Charles Library, courtesy Snøhetta

Read about how Snøhetta, the internationally acclaimed architecture firm who designed the Charles, is changing the way we absorb architecture.  

 

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Beyond the Notes Announces 2018-2019 Season!

Temple University Library’s award-winning noontime concert series, Beyond the Notes, proudly announces its fifth season!
All concerts are held in Paley Library Lecture Hall.
Light refreshments served. Boyer recital credit given.
Mark your calendars!


Joyce Lindorff at the harpsichord

Joyce Lindorff, Professor of Keyboard

Wednesday, September 26, 2018
Couperin Birthday Celebration!
12:00pm – 12:50pm

Usher in the new school year with a celebration!  What kind of celebration?  A 350th birthday celebration for François Couperin!  Early keyboard professor, scholar, and harpsichord artist Joyce Lindorff will lead us in a birthday celebration with beautiful music by this eminent composer.  Birthday cake will be provided.


Zach Brock, violinist

Zach Brock, Artist in Residence, Jazz Violinist

Zach Brock, Boyer Artist in Residence Jazz Violin
Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018
12:00pm – 12:50pm

Grammy award winner, Boyer Artist in Residence, Zach Brock, “the pre-eminent improvising violinist of his generation”, evokes the spirit of John Coltrane, Bela Bartok, and Jimi Hendrix. Experience the creativity of this amazing musician!


Shannon Merlino, viola

Shannon Merlino, Boyer doctoral candidate

Early Music led by Shannon Merlino
Wednesday, November 14, 2018
12:00pm – 12:50pm

Be transported to another place and time while doctoral student Shannon Merlino leads a group of fellow musicians and colleagues
in presenting early music at the library.


Philip O'Banion

Philip O’Banion, Director, Temple University Percussion Ensemble

Temple University Percussion Ensemble, Philip O’Banion, director
Wednesday, December 5, 2018
12:00pm – 12:50pm

Need to chill for an hour during finals? The Temple Percussion Ensemble will rock the library, guaranteed!


Charles Abramovic at the piano

Charles Abramovic, Chair of Keyboard Studies

Piano Studio of Charles Abramovic
Wednesday, February 6th, 2019
12:00pm – 12:50pm

Always a favorite, as Charles Abramovic joins his students in performing for the library audiences. Come to see and hear these amazing students perform!


Allen Krantz, guitar

Allen Krantz, guitar

Guitar Studio of Allen Krantz
Wednesday, March 27th, 2019
12:00pm – 12:50pm

What can be more beautiful than the music of a guitar?  How about two or three guitars playing together! Join us as the talented guitar students of Allen Krantz share their beautiful music!


Beyond the Notes thanks Temple University Libraries and the Boyer College of Music and Dance for their support of this series.

Relax. Refresh. Renew. Enjoy!

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Library Search: Enhanced version now live

Based on feedback received from the university community, Temple University Libraries released an enhanced version of the Library Search on August 13th, 2018. During the 2018-2019 academic year, the Libraries will continue to make further updates to the search.

Please refer to our Library Search Road Map and Frequently Asked Questions page for more information and check the library website throughout the year for further updates. If you have any additional questions, please contact asktulibrary@temple.edu.