Graduates

CURRENT GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCHERS

 

Nima Asadi (Spring 2017 – current)
NimaANima Asadi is a PhD student at the Computer and Information Science department at Temple University. Nima is a research assistant at the DABI center where his research is in artificial intelligence and data mining with primary focus on temporal data and network prediction and analysis. Prior to Temple, he received a master’s degree in Embedded Systems from Sweden and a Bachelor’s degree in Electronics from Iran. Nima is working with Dr. Rege on her NSF CPS grant and is utilizing state of the art in AI and machine learning to characterize and analyze adversarial behavior, intrusion chain progress and adversarial group dynamics during cybercrime commission.

His publications include:

Asadi, N., Rege, A. & Obradovic, Z. (forthcoming). “An Assessment of Group Dynamics During Cyber Crime Through Temporal Network Topology”. Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling & Prediction and Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation (SBP-BRiMS).

Asadi, N., Rege, A. & Obradovic, Z. (forthcoming). “Analysis of Adversarial Movement Through Characteristics of Graph Topological Ordering”. Proceedings of the International Conference on Cyber Situational Awareness, Data Analytics and Assessment (Cyber SA 2018).

Rege, A., Obradovic, Z., Asadi, N., Parker, E., Pandit, R., Masceri, N., Singer, B. (2018) “Predicting Adversarial Cyber Intrusion Stages Using Autoregressive Neural Networks,” IEEE Intelligent Systems PP(99):1-1. Impact Factor 2.374.

Rege, A., Obradovic, Z., Asadi, N. , Parker, E. , Masceri, N. , Singer, B.  & Pandit, R. (forthcoming). “Using a Real-Time Cybersecurity Exercise Case Study to Understand Temporal Characteristics of Cyberattacks”. Proceedings from the 2017 International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling & Prediction and Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation (SBP-BRiMS).

Rege, A., Obradovic, A., Asadi, N. , Singer, S. & Masceri, N. (forthcoming). “A Temporal Assessment of Cyber Intrusion Chains Using Multidisciplinary Frameworks and Methodologies”. Proceedings of the  International Conference on Cyber Situational Awareness, Data Analytics and Assessment (Cyber SA 2017). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Xplore Digital Library.

Asadi, N., Saadatmand, M., & Sjödin, M. (2013). “Run-time monitoring of timing constraints: A survey of methods and tools”. Proceedings of the International Conference on Software Engineering Advances (ICSEA’13).

 


PAST GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCHERS

Edward Parker (Fall 2017)
EdPEd Parker has been serving as an all source analyst for the Army National Guard for 5 years. The position includes taking and analyzing HUMINT, SIGINT, MASINT, IMINT, AND OSINT in order to focus the information into a form battlefield commanders can use to make the most well-informed decisions.

Ed received his B.A. in Criminal Justice from Temple University. During that time, he received a CARAS undergraduate research award that supported his research work titled “Moving Towards Proactive Cyber Security.” He also worked as undergraduate research assistant with Dr. Rege on her NSF CPS grant. He returns to Temple this Fall 2017 to start the Criminal Justice PhD program. He is interested in national security and critical infrastructure protection (both physical and digital). He worked with Dr. Rege on her NSF CAREER project.

His publications include:

Rege, A., Biswas, S., Bai, L., Parker, E. & McJunkin, T. (forthcoming). “Using Simulators to Assess Knowledge and Behavior of “Novice” Operators of Critical Infrastructure under Cyberattack Events”. Proceedings of the 10th International Symposium on Resilient Control Systems (ISRCS). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Rege, A., Parker, E. & McJunkin, T. (forthcoming). “Using a Critical Infrastructure Game to Provide Realistic Observation of the Human in the Loop by Criminal Justice Students”. Proceedings of the 10th International Symposium on Resilient Control Systems (ISRCS). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Rege, A., Adams, J., Parker, E., Singer, B., Masceri, N. & Pandit, R. (forthcoming). Using Cyber-security Exercises to Study Adversarial Intrusion Chains, Decision-Making, and Group Dynamics. Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Cyber Warfare and Security.

Rege, A., Obradovic, Z., Asadi, N., Parker, E. , Masceri, N. , Singer, B. & Pandit, R. (2017). “Using a Real-Time Cybersecurity Exercise Case Study to Understand Temporal Characteristics of Cyberattacks”. Proceedings from the 2017 International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling & Prediction and Behavior Representation in Modeling and Simulation (SBP-BRiMS).

Rege, A., Parker, E., Singer, B. & Masceri, N. (2017). A Qualitative Exploration of Adversarial Adaptability, Group Dynamics, and Cyber Intrusion Chains. Summer Issue of Journal of Information Warfare.

 

Janice Paulson (Fall 2015-May 2017)
JaniceP
Janice holds Summa Cum Laude and Cum Laude undergraduate degrees in Computer Network Engineering and Computer Network Security from Delaware Technical and Community College and Wilmington University. In 2010 she founded Delaware’s first annually reoccurring multi day information security conference, Security BSides Delaware. To celebrate BSidesDE’s 5th year, “Spawn Camp” was started to allow for dedicated children’s events focusing on STEM interests.

As a graduate student, she was excited to approach cyber security from the criminal justice perspective. Traditionally cyber security is primarily focused on the technical aspects of information systems. Examining crime theories is a fascinating way to build more complete risk mitigation strategies that consider the adversarial models becoming apparent in the industry. She applied her industry experience towards Dr. Rege’s NSF CPS grant. Janice earned her MA in Criminal Justice in May 2017.

 

Bo Niemoczynski (Fall 2015-Spring 2016)
Bo
Bogdan Niemoczynski is a Ph. D. student at Temple University after receiving his MSEE and BS in Physics from Temple University and East Stroudsburg University respectively. His primary focus is on control systems and security. He is experienced with PID control, nonlinear control, magnetics, and cryptography. He assisted Dr. Rege with with her NSF CPS project.

 

 

 

James Kollmer (Fall 2015-Spring 2016)
Bo
James has a BA in Physics from East Stroudsburg University and a BS in Electrical Engineering from Temple University. His focus is in power systems, controls, and hardware security. He worked on the NSF CPS project, where his role was to both construct and test the IEEE 9 bus system in both hardware and in simulation. He assisted Dr. Rege with her NSF CPS project.



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