Online Forum

Temple Law Review’s Online Forum seeks to provide succinct, timely analysis of current legal developments. We welcome submissions from faculty, practitioners, alumni of the Law Review, and current editors/staff. To submit an essay, please email tlawrev@temple.edu with the subject heading “Submission for Online Forum.”

For up-to-date information about Third Circuit precedent, please also visit the TLR 3d Circuit Blog.


 

TLR Symposium Presents: A Compilation of Bill Whitford’s Contributions to Legal Scholarship

Posted on September 7th, 2014

Bill Whitford (Emeritus Professor of Law, The University of Wisconsin Law School) has written extensively on contract law, consumer protection, and bankruptcy. In advance of its 2014 Symposium—to be held in his honor on October 24—Temple Law Review has compiled many of Professor Whitford’s significant contributions to legal scholarship. Please explore the extensive—albeit non-exhaustive—list of Professor Whitford’s writings below. It is organized […]



The 2014 Kohn Lecture presented by Chief Justice Leo E. Strine, Jr. – “Regular (Judicial) Order As Equity: The Enduring Value Of The Distinct Judicial Role”

Posted on August 21st, 2014

On Thursday, October 9, 2014 at 4:00 PM, Chief Justice Leo E. Strine, Jr.—the 8th Chief Justice of the Delaware Supreme Court—will present “Regular (Judicial) Order As Equity: The Enduring Value Of The Distinct Judicial Role” as the inaugural speaker in the Harold E. Kohn Lectureship. This event marks what would have been the 100th […]



Dr. Richard Ofshe, “Overcoming False Confessions and Coerced Statements in the Dawning Age of Interrogation Recordation”

Posted on November 17th, 2012

During the 2012 TLR Symposium held on November 9, 2012, Dr. Richard J. Ofshe, Professor of Sociology at the University of California-Berkeley, presented his article “Overcoming False Confessions and Coerced Statements in the Dawning Age of Interrogation Recordation.” Dr. Ofshe, one of the leading scholars in the field of false confessions and interrogations, believes that […]



Special Issues in False Confessions

Posted on November 16th, 2012

The final panel of the 2012 TLR Symposium, held on November 9, 2012, focused on special issues regarding false confessions. Panel members included: Allison Redlich, Associate Professor in the School of Criminal Justice at the State University of New York at Albany; Jim Trainum, a retired law enforcement detective with the Metropolitan Police Department in […]



False Confessions: An Exonoree’s Perspective

Posted on November 15th, 2012

During the 2012 TLR Symposium held on November 9, 2012, Byron Halsey presented the story of how he was coerced into confessing to a crime he didn’t commit. He was convicted of the crime and remained in prison for almost twenty years before being exonerated. In 1985, Halsey was questioned about the murder of his […]



The Use of Deception and Other Ethical Implications in Interrogation Methods

Posted on November 14th, 2012

As part of the 2012 TLR Symposium held on November 9, 2012, a panel of experts discussed deception and other strategic tactics used during police interrogations. Professor Edward Ohlbaum of Temple Law moderated the panel, comprised of Professor Louis Natali of Temple Law and Joseph P. Buckley III, a criminal enforcement consultant on interrogation methods […]



Promoting Accuracy in the Use of Confession Evidence: An Argument for Pre-Trial Reliability Hearings to Prevent Wrongful Convictions

Posted on November 13th, 2012

At the 2012 TLR Symposium held on November 9, 2012, a panel of experts discussed ways that confessions can be contaminated during the interrogation process and considered ways that courts could examine the reliability of confessions before trial. The panel included: Richard Leo, Professor of Law at the University of San Francisco School of Law; […]



Dr. Saul Kassin: Explaining False Confessions and Their Effects

Posted on November 12th, 2012

At the 2012 TLR Symposium held on November 9, 2012, Dr. Saul Kassin delivered the Keynote Speech on his research of false confessions. Dr. Kassin is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, who pioneered the scientific study of false confessions by developing a taxonomy that distinguishes types of false […]



Tax Law Puts Baby in the Corner: Perpetuating Stereotypical Conceptions of Women Through Innocent Spouse Relief

Posted on June 2nd, 2012

It was a Monday morning at the IRS Office of Chief Counsel. I, the bright-eyed, bushy-tailed intern was dressed in my best suit in preparation for my first meeting with a taxpayer. My attorney supervisor had explained to me that the taxpayer we were meeting was petitioning the Tax Court for innocent spouse relief. The […]



2012 Philadelphia Bar Association’s Justice Sotomayor Diversity Award

Posted on April 4th, 2012

On March 28, 2012, the Philadelphia Bar Association awarded its Justice Sotomayor Diversity Award to the Liacouras Committee, formed in 1970 to study the Pennsylvania Bar examination and determine whether its grading practices were discriminatory against African Americans who sought admission to the Pennsylvania Bar. The editors and staff of the Temple Law Review wish […]