GEA Welcome Reception & Happy Hour

Welcome back, Temple Graduate English friends and scholars!

The GEA would like to welcome all incoming and continuing students to our first event of the Fall semester, a meeting and meet & greet for the incoming class of MFA, MA, and PhD students.

On Friday, August 22 at 3pm, we will convene in the Women’s Studies Lounge (Anderson Hall 8th floor) for a short, informal meeting, during which a small panel of graduate students will speak about the state of the department, and some need-to-know items about being a graduate student at Temple. We warmly welcome your presence along with any additional information you’re willing to provide.

After the meeting, we will reconvene for the first HAPPY HOUR of the fall semester at Prohibition Taproom (501 North 13th Street) at 5 p.m. Please keep in mind that the meeting (and the happy hour, of course) is relevant to all graduate students. We hope to see you there!

Along with an opportunity to meet the new class of graduate students, the meeting will also include a brief presentation of a project that has been evolving over the summer, which involves a newly crafted vision statement for the English department. This statement, along with several other practical ideas for shaping our department are products generated by the labor of a group of graduate students who have been working collaboratively for several months. While this group is not directly associated with the GEA, many of you received notice of, and/or participated in it. We are eager to share these ideas with those of you who could not attend the initial meeting over the summer, as well as with the incoming students.

As a final note, we’d like to thank those of you who have consistently contributed to and supported the GEA. We cannot stress how grateful we are for your attendance and participation at GEA events. Because of your support, we were able to have a very successful conference last fall, an excellent symposium in the spring, and several other great events. Over the past several years, members of the GEA and many other graduate students have been persistently striving to strengthen our grad community, since part of our strength lies in our numbers. We make up a significant portion of this department as both students and instructors; moreover, some of us devote a substantial part of our lives to this institution, and in many cases, when we leave, our accomplishments here at Temple follow us in our professional lives. With that in mind, we know there are many of you (ourselves included) who would like to see our department in a better state. Part of the GEA’s purpose is to act as an advocate for graduate students in this department—we are here to relate the state of the department to the graduate student body, and to convey the state of the student body to the department. Please let us know what we can do for you, and we hope you’ll continue to help us work to improve our department and our community.

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“Michel Foucault on Rene Magritte” lecture tomorrow

Join the Art History department tomorrow, May 1, for a guest lecture with art and visual culture historian Catherine Soussloff (UCSC). Professor Sousloff will be lecturing on French philosopher Michel Foucault’s engagement of art history and the works of surrealist painter Rene Magritte. The lecture will take place at 5:30pm in Tyler School of Art, room B004.

foucault

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Theory Reading Group Tomorrow, 4/22

The Theory Reading Group will meet on Tuesday, April 22, at 11:00 AM in Anderson 1006 to discuss a reading from Axel Honneth’s Pathologies of Reason: On the Legacy of Critical Theory.

The excerpt has been circulated via the Temple Graduate English listserv. Please contact Charlie Manis with any questions.

We welcome any and all comers!

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THIS FRIDAY: Celebrate Samuel R. Delany’s Performative Poetics

THE MOTION OF LIGHT
Celebrating Samuel R. Delany’s Performative Poetics
Friday April 11, 2:00 PM in the Arts Cafe
Kelly Writers House, 3805 Locust Walk, University of Pennsylvania

Tributes to Delany to honor his contribution to Temple-Penn Poetics, with Fred Moten, Kenneth James, Terry Rowden, Holly Wilson, Ira Livingston, and Jena Osman with a special message from John Keene.

Organized by Charles Bernstein and Tracie Morris, who will host the event and toast the guest of honor. The celebration will begin with a screening of The Polymath or, The Life and Opinions of Samuel R. Delany, Gentleman, presented by the film maker, Fred Barney Taylor, and will conclude with a reading by Chip Delany. See full schedule below.

  • Schedule:
    2:00 – Screening of The Polymath or, The Life and Opinions of Samuel R.
    Delany, Gentleman
    3:30 – Kenneth James, Terry Rowden
    4:15 – Ira Livingston
    4:45 – Tracie Morris
    5:30 – Keynote Address by Fred Moten
    6:30 – Jena Osman, Sarah Micklem, and (in absentia) John Keene
    6:45 – Close Listening with Samuel Delany and Charles Bernstein
    7:15 – Samuel Delany Reading  
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GEA Happy Hour THIS FRIDAY in West Philly

The GEA is finally heading across the river for happy hour, this Friday, April 11th, at City Tap House (39th and Walnut). City Tap House is known city-wide for their happy hour specials and their great outdoor seating options, on two terraces with stone fire pits.

We will be meeting there at 5:00pm. From campus, via the Market-Frankford Line, City Tap House is three blocks south of the 40th Street stop.

 

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THIS WEDNESDAY: GEA Graduate Student Research Symposium

The GEA enthusiastically encourages our graduate student community to join us this Wednesday, April 9at the second annual Temple English Graduate Student Research Symposium

GEA Symposium 2014Feel free to attend for the entirety or for any part of the symposium, which will include a catered lunch, two panels, a coffee break, and a reception. See the event page for more information on the schedule and the papers being presented. We hope to see you all there!

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This Tuesday: Theory Reading Group

The Theory Reading Group will be convening this Tuesday, April 1, from 11:00am to 12:00pm in Anderson 821, to continue their discussion of Eric Hayot’s On Literary Worlds. All members of the Temple Graduate English department are warmly invited. Contact Charlie Manis for more information, and for a .pdf of the chapters under discussion. 

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Disability and Change Symposium, March 26

 

This Wednesday, March 26, Temple University’s Interdisciplinary Faculty Council on Disability will host their annual Disability and Change Symposium: In-Between Spaces, Places, and Ways of BeingThe conference will run from 1:00 – 4:00pm and will feature a speaker panel and roundtable discussion.

 

The 2014 symposium will explore how the concept of “transitions” can be applied to a variety of disability-related contexts and disciplines. The theme invites speakers examining practical, philosophical, and historical issues that hinge on the idea of in-betweenness, fluidity, and movement between spaces, places, and ways of being. Presentations include Beth Linker (University of Pennsylvania) on “Manliness in Transition: Disabled Veterans Returning Home from War,” and Rachel Adams (Columbia University) on “From Freaks to Disability: A Conversion Narrative.” See the event site for more information and to register for the conference.

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This Thursday: Works-In-Progress workshop

Please join the GEA for a works-in-progress (WIP) workshop on Thursday, March 27 at 12:30pm in Anderson 1221. Ted Howell will be presenting his paper entitled “The Earth Beating Time: Howards End in the Anthropocene,” which he will formally present on April 4th at the Society for Novel Studies Conference, “Land and the Novel,” at the University of Utah. We are grateful to have this early opportunity to have a look at Ted’s work.

Ted has provided the following abstract of his paper:

Critics have often turned to E.M. Forster’s Howards End because of how compellingly it engages ideas about place (Howards End itself) and space (the pastoral countryside becoming suburban) in connection with larger concerns about the condition of England in an age of empire. What remains unexplored is how its places and spaces reveal a conception of the Earth as a planetary unit linked to a geological timeline. My paper attends to how the land of Forster’s novel is not the land of the nation, or the land as surveyed by developers, but rather a deep, eonic Earth separate from nation, city, or suburb. I argue that Howards End narrates an Earth belonging to no one. While the land may be threatened by cosmopolitan urbanism, the Earth will always remain, in the words of the narrator, “beating time.” Turning to some of the proto-environmentalist and “back to nature” thinkers who influenced Forster’s fiction, I argue that Howards End departs from their backward-glancing pastoralism to look forward to the civilization that will succeed modernity. Sitting squarely between its onset and the present moment, Howards End exemplifies the literature of the Anthropocene: aware of the interconnection between nature and culture and eager to emphasize the planet’s global resilience while mourning its local destruction. As modernity accelerates, as London creeps and suburbs spread, at the moment when early signs of climate change appear, Forster’s novel proposes that while it may be impossible to go “back to the land,” the Earth persists, awaiting a better future.

The paper has been circulated through the Graduate English listserv. Contact TempleGEA@gmail.com with any questions, or for an additional copy of the essay. Hope to see you Thursday!

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