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Hope Rising: A Benefit Concert for Stand Tall International

When: October 14th and 15th, 7:30pm

 Where: Conwell Dance Theater

1801 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19122

Tickets:

$20 General Admission / $10 Student

www.danceboxoffice.com

 

Hope Rising: A Benefit for Stand Tall International

Nationally renowned artists from New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia bring their socially conscious voices together to save the lives of disabled children in East Africa.

 

Performing artists include:

  • Fôr Dance Co.
  • Mook Dance Company
  • Evalina “Wally” Carbonell
  • D2D: Dare to Dance
  • Praevado Dance Collective
  • Nickerson-Rossi Dance

 

Special Presentations by:

  • Kariamu & Company: Traditions with soloist Shaness Kemp
  • Koresh Youth Ensemble
  • Boyer College Student Piano Trio:

Xuan Yao, violin

Elena Smith, cello

Lamying Cheng, piano

 

Presented by Fôr Dance Company and the Boyer College of Music and Dance, all proceeds from the evening benefit Stand Tall International (www.standtallinternational.org), an organization that arranges life-saving surgery for children with severe spinal deformities.

Facebook Event

https://www.facebook.com/events/559113464213201/

Stand Tall Website

http://www.standtallinternational.org/

 Stand Tall Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwB9SmqM6w8

About Stand Tall International

Stand Tall International started in 2013 when the founders Masha Balovlenkov and Jason Smith traveled to Africa to volunteer in the small town of Moshi, Tanzania, where they met 11-year-old Benson Mushi. At the time, Benson was almost paralyzed with spinal tuberculosis (TB). He had visited every hospital in his region and no one could provide a diagnosis, much less perform his complicated spinal surgery. Masha traveled with him to Ghana where he received the lifesaving procedure. After his extensive recovery, Benson returned to Tanzania and Stand Tall raised enough money to send him to private school. Through this journey, Masha and Jason learned how changing the life of one child impacts the health of the entire community, and through the fundraising efforts of Stand Tall, they are continuing in their mission to provide this same life-changing support to other children in East Africa. 

Press Contact: Christina Eltvedt, MFA dance student and event organizer: tuf64593@temple.edu

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Dance Research Journal

2013_08_27 Boyer Faculty

Dr. Mark Franko

Dance Research Journal

In addition to the annual conference, CORD publishes the Dance Research Journal (DRJ) three times per year. DRJ is a peer-reviewed premiere publication for dance scholarship of international reach and includes articles, book reviews, and lists books received. Published articles address dance history, theory, pedagogy, politics, science, ethnography, and intersections with cultural, gender, critical race, and diasporic studies among others. DRJ is committed to cross-disciplinary research with a dance perspective. DRJ is edited by our very own Dr. Mark Franko. Dr. Franko wrote a review essay in DRJ 48/2 (August 2016) on interwar French dance theory and he is also co-editing the next issue of DRJ 48.3 (Dec. 2016) with Jens Richard Giersdorf on Randy Martin and Dance Studies.

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CORD Conference Presenters from Dance Department

cordfinweb

CORD

The Congress on Research in Dance (CORD) http://www.cordance.org/ is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides opportunities for dance professionals from a broad range of specialties to exchange ideas, resources, and methodologies through publication, international and regional conferences, and workshops. The organization encourages research in all aspects of dance and related fields and promote the accessibility of research materials. This year, CORD celebrates its 50th anniversary!

 

CORD Conference Presenters from Dance Department

We have several Dance Department faculty members who will be presenting papers at CORD’s annual conference in November. Professors’ Sally Ann Ness, Sherril Dodds and Mark Franko will all be participating. The conference is held at a different location in the U.S. or abroad every year and this year the conference will take place at Pomona College in Claremont, California. This year’s conference title is: Beyond Authenticity and Appropriation: Bodies, Authorship and Choreographies of Transmission. Sherril Dodds will be presenting on a panel titled, Forever Contemporary: Pop Star Choreographies of Mediated “Authenticities.” Her paper will examine Michael Jackson’s facial choreography, in dialogue with black performance theory, to demonstrate how he resists, negotiates and challenges the limited framework of black masculinity provided by popular music. Sally Ann Ness’s will be presenting a paper titled, Encounters with Wild Bears: Trans-Species Relations in Yosemite National Park. Her presentation examines the history of human-bear encounters in Yosemite National Park illuminates choreographies of “the wild” in both public and private contexts of American culture and society. Bears and humans in Yosemite move each other into forms of action that are ritualistic as well as spontaneous and instinctive as well as intelligent. A case in point from a rock climbing excursion undertaken in 2012 demonstrates the trans-species character of choreographic meaning-making emblematic of visitor cultural performances in Yosemite. Acting in concert, bears and humans move together through an eco-semiotics of inter-habitation creating forms of spatial practice in which new embodiments of wildness emerge.

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Philadelphiadanceprojects FALL 2016

philadelphiadanceprojects  FALL 2016

 

PLEASE JOIN US FOR THESE EVENTS IN SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER

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CONSIDERING CHOREOGRAPHER 

YVONNE RAINER

a mini-festival on October 15-19

spotlighting the career and influence of postmodernist choreographer Yvonne Rainer.

 

Saturday, October 15 and Sunday, October 16  It all begins with a two-day workshop led by Pat Catterson on Rainer’s seminal work Trio A.  The workshop examines Trio A’s philosophical, physical and historical relevance.  Participants will learn part of the dance, create their own compositions and engage in a discussion of its ideas, contexts and their experiences,

Trio A workshop: 1-5PM at the Performance Garage (1515 Brandywine Street).

 

“Fifty years later there is still much to be learned from Yvonne Rainer’s 1966 influential work Trio A,”said Pat Catterson, Rainer’s long-time rehearsal assistant.  “Trio A’s form, vocabulary, and performing stance challenged traditional choreographical methods and modes of presentation.  This workshop provides an introduction to an aesthetic that has served as a springboard for succeeding generations of dance makers.”

 

Wednesday, October 19 at 6PM features the Philadelphia premiere of the documentary film Feelings are Facts: The Life of Yvonne Rainer by former Philadelphia filmmaker Jack Walsh, with a post-screening discussion with both Walsh and Rainer.

Following the film, at 8PMYvonne Rainer will present a lecture,

What’s So Funny? Laughter and Anger in the Time of the Assassins,” an amalgam of jokes and rants around the current emotional and political dilemmas of the artist and concerned citizen.

Both events will be at Christ Church Neighborhood House (20 North American Street).

 

Admission to the two-day workshop is $35.

RESV: info@philadanceprojects.org

Tickets to the Film Screening and Lecture are $25 ($10 for the film only and $20 for the lecture only).

(A special package of the workshop, screening, and lecture is available for $50. Please contact info@philadanceprojects.org)

Tickets may be purchased online at www.philadanceprojects.org

 

BILATERAL BUDAPEST/PHILADELPHIA 

DANCE ARTISTS EXCHANGE 2016

PDP is pleased to announce that ANNA BICZOK 

and IMRE VASS will guest artists in Philadelphia beginning mid-September for a three week creative and cultural exchange residency.

 

Meet The Bilateral Artists on Wednesday, September 21 at 7PM  at The Whole Shebang, 1813 South 11th Street.  www.thewholeshebangphilly.com

 

FREE   RSVP info@philadanceprojects.org      215.546.2552

  

 

Bilateral Interactions:  

PRACTICE SHARE AND QUICKSHARE PROJECT:

 

IMRE VASS invites peer artists to come together and share their practices, dance knowledge and choreography Thursday, September 29 6-9PM and Saturday, October 2, 12:30-4:30PM  at The Whole Shebang   FREE 

RSVP info@philadanceprojects.org   or   215.546.2552

 

ANNA BICZOK invites artists who would like to participate in a quick share project “Of maybe 4 or 5 rehearsal preparation and with the option to make a short performance event.”

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(Date/Time to be set by mutual availability)

If interested contact: info@philadanceprojects.org  

 

 

The Bilateral Dance Artists Exchange is presented by Philadelphia Dance Projects 

and made possible with support from the Trust for Mutual Understanding.

To date six contemporary dance artists have participated in a unique 3 week artist residency exchange through Philadelphia Dance Projects (PDP) in partnership with DanceUP (2012-2014) and the Hungary  Workshop Foundation.

 

PDP Presents is made possible with support from the Philadelphia Cultural Fund 

and individual supporters like you.

Support PDP  (paypal link)

 

 

MORE INFO about PDP and all events at www.philadanceprojects.org

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Temple University Scholar-in-Residence Program 2016

Temple University

INSTITUTE of DANCE SCHOLARSHIP

Scholar-in-Residence Program 2016

We are pleased to announce our Scholars-in-Residence for Fall 2016:

OCTOBER 10-14, 2016: Dr Harmony Bench, Ohio State University

Bench Photo

Harmony Bench is Assistant Professor in the Department of Dance at The Ohio State University, where she is also affiliated faculty with Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Translational Data Analytics. Her writing has appeared in numerous edited collections, as well as Dance Research Journal, The International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media, Participations, and Performance Matters, among others. Projects underway include a book in contract with University of Minnesota Press, tentatively entitled Dance as Common: Movement as Belonging in Digital Cultures, as well as Mapping Touring, a digital humanities and database project focused on the performance engagements of early 20th century dance companies.

 

OCTOBER 24-28, 2016: Dr Jane Desmond, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Jane Desmond, professor of anthropology

JANE DESMOND is Professor of Anthropology and Gender/Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, U.S.A., where she also directs the International Forum for U.S. Studies:  a Center for Transnational Study of the United States. Formerly a professional modern dancer and choreographer, she served on the dance/theater faculties at Cornell University and Duke University for many years prior to completing a Ph,D. in American Studies at Yale University. Since then, her scholarly work has focused broadly on issues of embodiment, visual display, and performativity. Her books include: Staging Tourism:  Bodies on Display from Waikiki to Sea World, and the influential edited collections  Meaning in Motion:  New Cultural Studies of Dance and Dancing Desires:  Choreographing Sexuality On and Off the Stage. Her latest book, Displaying Death/Animating Life: Human-Animal Relations in Art, Science, and Everyday Life is just out from the University of Chicago Press.

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Screenshot_2016-09-08-17-09-30-1

Touring with Kariamu and Company

Touring with Kariamu and Company

After graduating Temple’s Dance Program with a B.F.A. in dance, I was fortunate enough to tour with Kariamu and Company. I will always be grateful for this experience because it is often hard for performers to get gigs straight away out of college, and sometimes dancers end up falling into a job that they do not enjoy. Kariamu and Company kept me grounded in what I wanted my life to be while I had a job that was the total opposite. Being able to tour gave me the chance to receive a glimpse into the life I am starting to journey on. I have terrible fear of heights and airplanes, but touring with Kariamu and Company made me suck it up. As a person of the arts, you will do anything for your craft because you know it is what makes you truly happy. From flights to hotel rooms to rehearsals and actual performances, I had a chance to really connect with other dancers who are in the same position I am or have been there and are now figuring out their next chapters in their dance career. It was great to learn from other dancers and have a genuine connection with other people who are just as hungry for this life as I am. What I also took away from this experience is that I have accomplished one thing outside of my college career that I am proud of. I have toured nationally for a play starring a five time Grammy nominated jazz singer, performed pieces by a choreographer who has developed her own dance technique called Umfundalai, and worked with an award-winning visual artist. I never really had the time to sit down and think about it. Being able to work with such a passionate family who started a story from scratch and turn it into a multifaceted show has been such a blessing. There will be times, as a performer, where you will question if this is the life for you, but always remember you have this beautiful spirit that can’t be confined to a 9-5 so let it flourish and just watch what magnificent things start to appear more and more each day because of it.

 

To learn more about Kariamu and Company and the Clothesline Muse, click here

 

-Sophiann Moore

Temple BFA 2015

 

 

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Photo Credit: Eric Li

Bonding Through Improvisation

When I stepped into the room I didn’t know my professor. I barely knew anyone in the room.  It was the first full day of classes for my MFA program.  I had met a few of the dancers at orientation, where we had passed cursory greetings, but I wouldn’t have ventured to say that any of them were friends.  I was filled with anxious energy as so often happens during the first day of school.  My first day at Temple was a time full of opportunities but also with the unknown lurking in the shadows.  I was also nervous about the class because I was a novice at improv, or so I thought.  

 

Through that hour and a half, I’d come to realize that improv, when done with others, is form of communication and that my years of social dancing was the perfect preparation.  Even more importantly, I found real connection and friendship during my first class. Friendship wasn’t my express goal as I stepped into the classroom, but it was the most important aspect of the class for this San Francisco transplant.  
We meandered through Conwell Theater, freely exploring how our bodies move. I started timidly interacting and acknowledging other first year MFAs that I had met at orientation, but there was one girl standing in front of me that I did not know. She reached her hand out and I instinctively followed her movements. We clicked, we both moved with the same intensity and with a similar rhythm. I naturally trusted her until we were both throwing our full weight at each other like a fast and vigorous human seesaw.  It was magical to connect with someone so purely without the burden of words. It was then and there that I knew that I wanted to get to know her. Afterwards our conversation naturally flowed, but our bond had already been formed without words.  

 

-Alissa Elegant

1st Year M.F.A.

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The Balancing Act of the MFA Dance Student

The Balancing Act of the MFA Dance Student

By Amanda Keller, First Year MFA Student

As a first year MFA student in the Dance Department at Temple, I’ve quickly found that a major component to this program is being able to balance the academic rigor of the seminar classes with the equally rigorous work of choreographing and making dance works. Even after only two weeks into this program, it has become apparent to my fellow MFAers that we are going to be pulled in various directions. There is equal importance placed on examining and discussing the theoretical dance research as there is on choreographing enlightening and engaging dance works. In a way, the strict line that exists between the theory and choreographing seems to fade away.

As someone who has a Master of Arts degree in Education, I’ve been able to compare my experiences in these different graduate programs and the major difference is that the MFA requires you to make the connection between the theoretical research we are reading and apply it in a performative and unique way to your choreography. The performative component in the MFA in Dance is what compelled me to return to graduate school. Having the opportunity to incorporate a theoretical framework by using research to inform your work and create a piece with multi-layers and a real depth to it is such a rewarding experience.

Finding the time to keep up with the readings and spend time in the studio rehearsing is tricky. I’ve found that playing music I’m thinking about using in my choreography while reading for my classes has helped with the integration of the theory into the dances I’m conjuring in my head. Another thing I’ve tried is jotting down notes in my notebook when something inspires me in the reading that I want to try out in the studio. I am looking forward to discovering additional techniques and tricks to balance the demands of the program.

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Sophomore: A Whole New Journey

Sophomore: A Whole New Journey

My freshman year at Temple was nothing short of awesome, inspiring, and devastating. I travelled 1,467 miles across the country and from the moment that I stepped on campus and took the Temple air in, I knew that I was home. I jumped in headfirst.

The great thing about being in a new unknown place is that there is nothing to lose. I left my past dance experiences in Texas and came in with an open mind; I auditioned for everything that I could, I volunteered when people were looking to cast their pieces and attended as many shows as possible. Looking back on my freshman year, it was awesome. I learned a lot about myself and gained a new appreciation for dance. Often, dance training before college places dance in this small, biased bubble. Coming to Temple helped me break this bubble and opened my eyes to a much bigger and more diverse dance world than I ever imagined.Unfortunately, in the midst of all of my excitement, I ended up injuring my knee. It was second semester right before finals and I was absolutely devastated. I wanted to take good care of my body but I did not want to withdraw at the end of the year. With a bit of professional medical attention (and plenty of R.I.C.E.) I was lucky enough to complete my final dance exams. However, when summer came I had to quit cold turkey.

I spent my summer interning in my second major’s field and working closely with my physical therapist to get stronger. My goal was to come back to Temple and work harder than the year before.

Now, it is September and it is a few days into the semester. My body is in shock due to the fact that I wasn’t allowed to dance much over the summer. Even through the aches and pain in my hamstrings, I feel great. My main focus this year is to maintain a healthy body, improve accuracy in my movement, and to choreograph.

The 2015-2016 school year was about stepping out of my comfort zone, but this year is all about eliminating my comfort zone and encouraging others to do the same.

 

-Lexie Hairston

Second Year B.F.A.

 

 

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A Student Perspective on Temple University Dance Department’s Study Abroad Program in Rome

Dancing in Italy

By: Meghan McFerran

On May 11, I embarked on my first journey traveling overseas to Europe to study abroad at Temple University’s campus in Rome, Italy! I was fortunate enough to have a very unique experience compared to the average student studying in a classroom setting. While most of my peers studying at Temple Rome packed textbooks and pencils in their backpacks in preparation for class abroad, I packed my Theraband, water bottle and a new leotard. I was going to spend the next six weeks studying dance in one of the most artistic and historic cities in the world.

As a dance major, my classroom was the dance studio at IALS, located just a few short blocks from Temple Rome’s main campus. Every Tuesday and Thursday at 9:00 am, after a quick Italian breakfast of a cappuccino and Nutella croissant at the café next door, nine of us dance majors walked into the cozy sized dance studio feeling energized and ready to move.

IALS (pronounced “yalls”) has a studio concept similar to Broadway Dance Center in New York City; you sign in at the front desk and pay to take one of the various genres of classes offered each day such as Latin, ballet, contemporary jazz, etc. Us dance majors at Temple were privileged to have our dance professor from Temple, Jillian Harris, come along on the trip with us and teach us a two-hour modern class.

Due to the small studio space, our class focused on stretching and strengthening exercises as a warm-up, and moved into floor-work, footwork and a center combination. The class focused on proper alignment, gestures, shape making, dynamics and timing. This was a nice change from our usual modern classes at Temple because we had to work with the resources that we had and be more aware of our spatial patterns. We were lucky to have Jillian’s husband, Chris Farrell, accompany us with live music, which made class more fun.

At 11:00 am, us dancers grabbed lunch at the small deli around the corner, walked a few blocks down the road to Temple Rome campus, and got ready for Creative Process. This course required us to create an original piece of choreography drawing inspiration from a piece of artwork that we saw at the National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art. From this inspiration, we were to choose one theme to stick with throughout our creative process. The painting I chose was a piece called “Cielo e Mar” by Italian artist Baldo Diodato. I focused on the theme of pushing and pulling of gravity for my piece. Each class we developed our themes by creating phrases and variations of phrases, presenting our work and getting feedback from other students. For three hours, all nine of us worked in a different creative space, from the park in Villa Borghese to the small parking lot outside campus to the empty classrooms on the fourth floor. We each kept journals to document our process and to hold onto ideas that we may want to use in the future.

After a day of dancing and letting our creative juices flow, we grabbed our water bottles and journals and headed out to explore the beautiful city of Rome. Just a half mile down the street from campus was the popular Piazza del Popolo. Here you could find your way to famous hand pressed pizza, Gelateria Della Palma with over 150 flavors (my favorite was Bacio), explore the ancient ruins, stand in the forum of the Colosseum, and make a wish in the Trevi Fountain all in one day. Having class twice a week also enabled us to travel on weekends. I had the privilege of traveling to Croatia, Tuscany, Florence, Perugia, and Greece while abroad.

At the end of our six weeks in Rome, we presented our creative process pieces to the faculty and other students. The walls of Temple Rome were decorated with beautiful photos, sculptures and artwork that the other Temple students had created. Being able to share the artistic space with other students was a fulfilling experience, and each piece of art expressed our journey of growth, exploration and unforgettable moments in Italy.
IMG_8362IMG_8067IMG_8299IMG_8226

 

meghanmcferran.com

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