Welcome

NBL_Collage_4Stress is associated with the onset and severity of a number of psychiatric illnesses, including mood and anxiety disorders. Although all of us experience stress, not everyone goes on to develop these disorders. The Neuroendocrinology and Behavior Laboratory (NBL) uses a variety of techniques from behavioral neuroscience, neuroendocrinology, and cellular and molecular biology to identify biological mechanisms that confer vulnerability or resilience to stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders.

Specific interests of our research include:

  • Stress effects on attention and other cognitive processes
  • Sex differences in stress-related receptors
  • Gonadal hormone modulation of stress response systems throughout the lifespan
  • Contact the Neuroendocrinology and Behavior Lab
    Temple University Department of Psychology - 1701 N. 13th St. - Weiss Hall - Philadelphia, PA 19122
    Office: (215) 204-1015 - Lab: (215) 204-7908 - debra.bangasser@temple.edu

  • Interested in joining the lab?

    Current Temple undergraduates click here for details.

    Prospective graduate students click here.

    Prospective post-doctoral fellows should contact Dr. Bangasser directly.

  • NBL News

    Congratulates to lab member Madeleine Salvatore for receiving the Clifford M. Kliger Memorial Award.

    Congratulations to lab alumna Sabina Khatnsis for being invited to present at the Emory STEM Research and Career Symposium.

    Congratulations to lab member Joy Bergmann for receiving a Creative Arts, Research, and Scholarship (CARAS) grant.

    Congratulations to lab members Madeleine Salvatore and Marni Shore for receiving Diamond Research Scholars Program Awards.

    A recent cover story in Science News featured research from our lab and others about sex differences in stress responses and their implications for understanding psychiatric disorders. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/his-stress-not-her-stress

    Dr. Bangasser was honored with the Janett Rosenberg Trubatch Career Development Award from the Society for Neuroscience. Supported by the Trubatch Family, this award recognizes originality and creativity in neuroscience research conducted by early-career professionals.